Pre-hospital management of patients with chest pain and/or dyspnoea of cardiac origin. A position paper of the Acute Cardiovascular Care Association (ACCA) of the ESC

ACCA study group on pre-hospital care

Abstract

Chest pain and acute dyspnoea are frequent causes of emergency medical services activation. The pre-hospital management of these conditions is heterogeneous across different regions of the world and Europe, as a consequence of the variety of emergency medical services and absence of specific practical guidelines. This position paper focuses on the practical aspects of the pre-hospital treatment on board and transfer of patients taken in charge by emergency medical services for chest pain and dyspnoea of suspected cardiac aetiology after the initial assessment and diagnostic work-up. The objective of the paper is to provide guidance, based on evidence, where available, or on experts' opinions, for all emergency medical services' health providers involved in the pre-hospital management of acute cardiovascular care.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean heart journal. Acute cardiovascular care
Volume9
Issue number1_suppl
Pages (from-to)59-81
Number of pages23
ISSN2048-8726
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2020

Keywords

  • Acute Coronary Syndrome/complications
  • Aneurysm, Dissecting/complications
  • Arrhythmias, Cardiac/complications
  • Cardiac Conduction System Disease/complications
  • Cardiac Tamponade/complications
  • Cardiovascular Diseases/complications
  • Chest Pain/etiology
  • Disease Management
  • Dyspnea/etiology
  • Electrocardiography
  • Emergency Medical Services/methods
  • Europe
  • Heart Failure/complications
  • Humans
  • Patient Transfer
  • Pericarditis/complications
  • Pulmonary Embolism/complications
  • Risk Assessment
  • ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/complications
  • Societies, Medical

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