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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Positive view and increased likely uptake of follow-up testing with analysis of cell-free fetal DNA as alternative to invasive testing among Danish pregnant women

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@article{02fc99bdcb3d40c4bc32b4df91134d9d,
title = "Positive view and increased likely uptake of follow-up testing with analysis of cell-free fetal DNA as alternative to invasive testing among Danish pregnant women",
abstract = "INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to investigate the attitude (view, likely uptake and preferred strategy) towards cell-free fetal DNA (cfDNA) testing among pregnant women before a first-trimester risk assessment for trisomy 21 (unselected women) and after obtaining a high risk.MATERIAL AND METHODS: Unselected and high-risk women attending first-trimester screening (Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital) were invited to fill out the questionnaire Antenatal testing for Down syndrome as an online survey.RESULTS: The survey included 203 unselected and 50 high-risk women (response rates of 74.8% and 84.7%, respectively). Nearly all considered cfDNA testing a positive development in antenatal care, and 97.2% would like it to be offered. Offering cfDNA testing as an alternative to invasive testing would increase the uptake of follow-up testing compared with invasive testing alone (98.8% vs. 90.7%, p < 0.001). Women who would only accept follow up by cfDNA testing were more likely to continue an affected pregnancy (30.0% vs. 3.6%, p < 0.001) or have doubts about termination (50.0% vs. 32.1%, p < 0.001).CONCLUSIONS: Offering cfDNA testing would likely increase the uptake of follow-up testing without a corresponding rise in the termination rate of affected fetuses as some women test for information only. However, both unselected and high-risk women had overwhelmingly positive views underlining attention to avoid routinization.",
keywords = "Journal Article",
author = "Miltoft, {Caroline B} and Line Rode and Ann Tabor",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2018 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.",
year = "2018",
month = may,
doi = "10.1111/aogs.13297",
language = "English",
volume = "97",
pages = "577--586",
journal = "Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica",
issn = "0001-6349",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Positive view and increased likely uptake of follow-up testing with analysis of cell-free fetal DNA as alternative to invasive testing among Danish pregnant women

AU - Miltoft, Caroline B

AU - Rode, Line

AU - Tabor, Ann

N1 - © 2018 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

PY - 2018/5

Y1 - 2018/5

N2 - INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to investigate the attitude (view, likely uptake and preferred strategy) towards cell-free fetal DNA (cfDNA) testing among pregnant women before a first-trimester risk assessment for trisomy 21 (unselected women) and after obtaining a high risk.MATERIAL AND METHODS: Unselected and high-risk women attending first-trimester screening (Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital) were invited to fill out the questionnaire Antenatal testing for Down syndrome as an online survey.RESULTS: The survey included 203 unselected and 50 high-risk women (response rates of 74.8% and 84.7%, respectively). Nearly all considered cfDNA testing a positive development in antenatal care, and 97.2% would like it to be offered. Offering cfDNA testing as an alternative to invasive testing would increase the uptake of follow-up testing compared with invasive testing alone (98.8% vs. 90.7%, p < 0.001). Women who would only accept follow up by cfDNA testing were more likely to continue an affected pregnancy (30.0% vs. 3.6%, p < 0.001) or have doubts about termination (50.0% vs. 32.1%, p < 0.001).CONCLUSIONS: Offering cfDNA testing would likely increase the uptake of follow-up testing without a corresponding rise in the termination rate of affected fetuses as some women test for information only. However, both unselected and high-risk women had overwhelmingly positive views underlining attention to avoid routinization.

AB - INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to investigate the attitude (view, likely uptake and preferred strategy) towards cell-free fetal DNA (cfDNA) testing among pregnant women before a first-trimester risk assessment for trisomy 21 (unselected women) and after obtaining a high risk.MATERIAL AND METHODS: Unselected and high-risk women attending first-trimester screening (Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital) were invited to fill out the questionnaire Antenatal testing for Down syndrome as an online survey.RESULTS: The survey included 203 unselected and 50 high-risk women (response rates of 74.8% and 84.7%, respectively). Nearly all considered cfDNA testing a positive development in antenatal care, and 97.2% would like it to be offered. Offering cfDNA testing as an alternative to invasive testing would increase the uptake of follow-up testing compared with invasive testing alone (98.8% vs. 90.7%, p < 0.001). Women who would only accept follow up by cfDNA testing were more likely to continue an affected pregnancy (30.0% vs. 3.6%, p < 0.001) or have doubts about termination (50.0% vs. 32.1%, p < 0.001).CONCLUSIONS: Offering cfDNA testing would likely increase the uptake of follow-up testing without a corresponding rise in the termination rate of affected fetuses as some women test for information only. However, both unselected and high-risk women had overwhelmingly positive views underlining attention to avoid routinization.

KW - Journal Article

U2 - 10.1111/aogs.13297

DO - 10.1111/aogs.13297

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 29350746

VL - 97

SP - 577

EP - 586

JO - Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica

JF - Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica

SN - 0001-6349

IS - 5

ER -

ID: 53707116