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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Positive view and increased likely uptake of follow-up testing with analysis of cell-free fetal DNA as alternative to invasive testing among Danish pregnant women

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  3. Cell-Free Fetal DNA in the Early and Late First Trimester

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INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to investigate the attitude (view, likely uptake and preferred strategy) towards cell-free fetal DNA (cfDNA) testing among pregnant women before a first-trimester risk assessment for trisomy 21 (unselected women) and after obtaining a high risk.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: Unselected and high-risk women attending first-trimester screening (Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital) were invited to fill out the questionnaire Antenatal testing for Down syndrome as an online survey.

RESULTS: The survey included 203 unselected and 50 high-risk women (response rates of 74.8% and 84.7%, respectively). Nearly all considered cfDNA testing a positive development in antenatal care, and 97.2% would like it to be offered. Offering cfDNA testing as an alternative to invasive testing would increase the uptake of follow-up testing compared with invasive testing alone (98.8% vs. 90.7%, p < 0.001). Women who would only accept follow up by cfDNA testing were more likely to continue an affected pregnancy (30.0% vs. 3.6%, p < 0.001) or have doubts about termination (50.0% vs. 32.1%, p < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS: Offering cfDNA testing would likely increase the uptake of follow-up testing without a corresponding rise in the termination rate of affected fetuses as some women test for information only. However, both unselected and high-risk women had overwhelmingly positive views underlining attention to avoid routinization.

Original languageEnglish
JournalActa Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica
Volume97
Issue number5
Pages (from-to)577-586
Number of pages10
ISSN0001-6349
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2018

    Research areas

  • Journal Article

ID: 53707116