Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
E-pub ahead of print

Physical activity, sedentary behavior and development of preeclampsia in women with preexisting diabetes

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. A marker of type VI collagen formation (PRO-C6) is associated with higher arterial stiffness in type 1 diabetes

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Diabetes, myometrium, and mitochondria in pregnant women at term

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Is there evidence of potential overtreatment of glycaemia in elderly people with type 2 diabetes? Data from the GUIDANCE study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Gestational diabetes and the human salivary microbiota: a longitudinal study during pregnancy and postpartum

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Effect of motivational interviewing on gestational weight gain and fetal growth in pregnant women with type 2 diabetes

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Increased leptin, decreased adiponectin and FGF21 concentrations in adolescent offspring of women with gestational diabetes

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

Aims: To explore the association between physical activity in early pregnancy and development of preeclampsia in women with preexisting diabetes. Methods: In a prospective cohort study of 189 women with preexisting diabetes (110 type 1 and 79 type 2 diabetes), physical activity during pregnancy including sedentary behavior was evaluated with the Pregnancy Physical Activity Questionnaire. Primary outcome was preeclampsia. Secondary outcomes were preterm delivery, large and small for gestational age infants. Results: Women developing preeclampsia (n = 23) had higher diastolic blood pressure in early pregnancy (mean 82 ± 9 SD vs. 77 ± 8, p = 0.004) and were more often nulliparous (91 vs. 52%, p < 0.001) compared with the remaining women (n = 166). Total physical activity in early pregnancy was similar between the groups (median 148 metabolic equivalent of task hours per week (MET-h/week) (interquartile range 118–227) versus 153 (121–205), p = 0.97). In early pregnancy, women developing preeclampsia reported a higher level of sedentary behavior (15 MET-h/week (7–18) versus 7 (4–15); p = 0.04); however, when adjusting for parity, diastolic blood pressure and smoking, the association attenuated (p = 0.13). Total physical activity and sedentary behavior in early pregnancy were not associated with preterm delivery, large or small for gestational age infants. Conclusions: Among women with diabetes, sedentary behavior was reported higher in early pregnancy in women developing preeclampsia compared with the remaining women, while total physical activity was similar. Sedentary behavior was a predictor of preeclampsia in the univariate analysis, but not in the multiple regression analysis, and larger studies are needed to evaluate this possible modifiable risk factor. Trial registration The study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (ID: NCT02890836).

Original languageEnglish
JournalActa Diabetologica
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
ISSN0940-5429
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 28 Nov 2019

    Research areas

  • Diabetes, Physical activity, Preeclampsia, Pregnancy, Risk factor, Sedentary behavior

ID: 58504419