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Phototype reproducibility and relation to objectively measured skin sensitivity is best when burn and tan reactivity to sun are answered separately

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@article{cead7bccdefa43ce9e67e6f02a72ddc3,
title = "Phototype reproducibility and relation to objectively measured skin sensitivity is best when burn and tan reactivity to sun are answered separately",
abstract = "BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Skin phototype questionnaires usually ask similar questions, but they differ in how the answers can be given. There is either one combined answer, which includes both tendency to burn and ability to tan, or 2 separate answers about burn and tan, respectively. We tested the reproducibility of different questionnaires and their relation to objectively measured skin phototype.METHOD: A total of 149 participants completed 3 skin phototype questionnaires distributed twice with median 3 months interval: (i) a Fitzpatrick questionnaire (FST-q) with combined answers about tendency to burn and ability to tan, (ii) a detailed questionnaire (Detail-q) with separate answers to 2 detailed questions about burn and tan and (iii) a short questionnaire (Short-q) with separate answers to 2 simplified questions about burn and tan. Objective skin phototype measurements were performed by measuring pigment protection factor (PPF) by spectrophotometry.RESULTS: Good-to-very-good reproducibility for all phototype questionnaires was shown by weighted kappa (κw ) values: κw = .65 for the FST-q with combined (burn and tan) answers; κw = .64 for tendency to burn and κw = .68 for ability to tan for the Detail-q; and κw = .72 for tendency to burn and κw = .85 for ability to tan for the Short-q. PPF at all measurement sites was best predicted by the Detail-q (highest r2 = 0.285 on the outer arm), followed by the Short-q and by the FST-q.CONCLUSION: The detailed questionnaire with separate answers to 2 detailed questions about tendency to burn and ability to tan has good reproducibility, correlates best with objective skin measurements and is therefore the recommended method for determining skin phototype.",
keywords = "Adult, Aged, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Skin, Sunburn, Surveys and Questionnaires",
author = "Giedre Bieliauskiene and Philipsen, {Peter A} and Wulf, {Hans Christian}",
note = "{\circledC} 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.",
year = "2018",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1111/phpp.12399",
language = "English",
volume = "34",
pages = "366--373",
journal = "Photodermatology, Photoimmunology & Photomedicine",
issn = "0905-4383",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Munksgaard",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Phototype reproducibility and relation to objectively measured skin sensitivity is best when burn and tan reactivity to sun are answered separately

AU - Bieliauskiene, Giedre

AU - Philipsen, Peter A

AU - Wulf, Hans Christian

N1 - © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

PY - 2018/11

Y1 - 2018/11

N2 - BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Skin phototype questionnaires usually ask similar questions, but they differ in how the answers can be given. There is either one combined answer, which includes both tendency to burn and ability to tan, or 2 separate answers about burn and tan, respectively. We tested the reproducibility of different questionnaires and their relation to objectively measured skin phototype.METHOD: A total of 149 participants completed 3 skin phototype questionnaires distributed twice with median 3 months interval: (i) a Fitzpatrick questionnaire (FST-q) with combined answers about tendency to burn and ability to tan, (ii) a detailed questionnaire (Detail-q) with separate answers to 2 detailed questions about burn and tan and (iii) a short questionnaire (Short-q) with separate answers to 2 simplified questions about burn and tan. Objective skin phototype measurements were performed by measuring pigment protection factor (PPF) by spectrophotometry.RESULTS: Good-to-very-good reproducibility for all phototype questionnaires was shown by weighted kappa (κw ) values: κw = .65 for the FST-q with combined (burn and tan) answers; κw = .64 for tendency to burn and κw = .68 for ability to tan for the Detail-q; and κw = .72 for tendency to burn and κw = .85 for ability to tan for the Short-q. PPF at all measurement sites was best predicted by the Detail-q (highest r2 = 0.285 on the outer arm), followed by the Short-q and by the FST-q.CONCLUSION: The detailed questionnaire with separate answers to 2 detailed questions about tendency to burn and ability to tan has good reproducibility, correlates best with objective skin measurements and is therefore the recommended method for determining skin phototype.

AB - BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Skin phototype questionnaires usually ask similar questions, but they differ in how the answers can be given. There is either one combined answer, which includes both tendency to burn and ability to tan, or 2 separate answers about burn and tan, respectively. We tested the reproducibility of different questionnaires and their relation to objectively measured skin phototype.METHOD: A total of 149 participants completed 3 skin phototype questionnaires distributed twice with median 3 months interval: (i) a Fitzpatrick questionnaire (FST-q) with combined answers about tendency to burn and ability to tan, (ii) a detailed questionnaire (Detail-q) with separate answers to 2 detailed questions about burn and tan and (iii) a short questionnaire (Short-q) with separate answers to 2 simplified questions about burn and tan. Objective skin phototype measurements were performed by measuring pigment protection factor (PPF) by spectrophotometry.RESULTS: Good-to-very-good reproducibility for all phototype questionnaires was shown by weighted kappa (κw ) values: κw = .65 for the FST-q with combined (burn and tan) answers; κw = .64 for tendency to burn and κw = .68 for ability to tan for the Detail-q; and κw = .72 for tendency to burn and κw = .85 for ability to tan for the Short-q. PPF at all measurement sites was best predicted by the Detail-q (highest r2 = 0.285 on the outer arm), followed by the Short-q and by the FST-q.CONCLUSION: The detailed questionnaire with separate answers to 2 detailed questions about tendency to burn and ability to tan has good reproducibility, correlates best with objective skin measurements and is therefore the recommended method for determining skin phototype.

KW - Adult

KW - Aged

KW - Female

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Skin

KW - Sunburn

KW - Surveys and Questionnaires

U2 - 10.1111/phpp.12399

DO - 10.1111/phpp.12399

M3 - Journal article

VL - 34

SP - 366

EP - 373

JO - Photodermatology, Photoimmunology & Photomedicine

JF - Photodermatology, Photoimmunology & Photomedicine

SN - 0905-4383

IS - 6

ER -

ID: 56141274