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Phase 1 study to access safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of kynurenine in healthy volunteers

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@article{9c61724744674a649aa60738b8a7984e,
title = "Phase 1 study to access safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of kynurenine in healthy volunteers",
abstract = "The kynurenine pathway (KP) is the main path for tryptophan metabolism, and it represents a multitude of potential sites for drug discovery in neuroscience, including pain, stroke, and epilepsy. L-kynurenine (LKYN), the first active metabolite in the pathway, emerges to be a prodrug targeting glutamate receptors. The safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of LKYN in humans have not been previously investigated. In an open-label, single ascending dose study, six participants received an intravenous infusion of 50, 100, and 150 µg/kg LKYN and new six participants received an intravenous infusion of 0.3, 0.5, 1, and 5 mg/kg LKYN. To compare the pharmacological effects between species, we investigated in vivo the vascular effects of LKYN in rats. In humans, LKYN was safe and well-tolerated at all dose levels examined. After infusion, LKYN plasma concentration increased significantly over time 3.23 ± 1.12 µg/mL (after 50 µg/kg), 4.04 ± 1.1 µg/mL (after 100 µg/kg), and 5.25 ± 1.01 µg/mL (after 150 µg/kg) (p ≤ 0.001). We observed no vascular changes after infusion compared with baseline. In rats, LKYN had no effect on HR and MAP and caused no dilation of dural and pial arteries. This first-in-human study of LKYN showed that LKYN was safe and well-tolerated after intravenous infusion up to 5 mg/kg over 20 minutes. The lack of change in LKYN metabolites in plasma suggests a relatively slow metabolism of LKYN and no or little feed-back effect of LKYN on its synthesis. The therapeutic potential of LKYN in stroke and epilepsy should be explored in future studies in humans.",
keywords = "epilepsy, glutamat, kynurenic acid, migraine, stroke",
author = "Al-Karagholi, {Mohammad Al-Mahdi} and Hansen, {Jakob M{\o}ller} and Dalia Abou-Kassem and Hansted, {Anna Koldbro} and Kumari Ubhayasekera and Jonas Bergquist and L{\'a}szl{\'o} V{\'e}csei and Inger Jansen-Olesen and Messoud Ashina",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2021 The Authors. Pharmacology Research & Perspectives published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd, British Pharmacological Society and American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.",
year = "2021",
doi = "10.1002/prp2.741",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
pages = "e00741",
journal = "Pharmacology Research & Perspectives",
issn = "2052-1707",
publisher = "JohnWiley & Sons Ltd",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Phase 1 study to access safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of kynurenine in healthy volunteers

AU - Al-Karagholi, Mohammad Al-Mahdi

AU - Hansen, Jakob Møller

AU - Abou-Kassem, Dalia

AU - Hansted, Anna Koldbro

AU - Ubhayasekera, Kumari

AU - Bergquist, Jonas

AU - Vécsei, László

AU - Jansen-Olesen, Inger

AU - Ashina, Messoud

N1 - © 2021 The Authors. Pharmacology Research & Perspectives published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd, British Pharmacological Society and American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

PY - 2021

Y1 - 2021

N2 - The kynurenine pathway (KP) is the main path for tryptophan metabolism, and it represents a multitude of potential sites for drug discovery in neuroscience, including pain, stroke, and epilepsy. L-kynurenine (LKYN), the first active metabolite in the pathway, emerges to be a prodrug targeting glutamate receptors. The safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of LKYN in humans have not been previously investigated. In an open-label, single ascending dose study, six participants received an intravenous infusion of 50, 100, and 150 µg/kg LKYN and new six participants received an intravenous infusion of 0.3, 0.5, 1, and 5 mg/kg LKYN. To compare the pharmacological effects between species, we investigated in vivo the vascular effects of LKYN in rats. In humans, LKYN was safe and well-tolerated at all dose levels examined. After infusion, LKYN plasma concentration increased significantly over time 3.23 ± 1.12 µg/mL (after 50 µg/kg), 4.04 ± 1.1 µg/mL (after 100 µg/kg), and 5.25 ± 1.01 µg/mL (after 150 µg/kg) (p ≤ 0.001). We observed no vascular changes after infusion compared with baseline. In rats, LKYN had no effect on HR and MAP and caused no dilation of dural and pial arteries. This first-in-human study of LKYN showed that LKYN was safe and well-tolerated after intravenous infusion up to 5 mg/kg over 20 minutes. The lack of change in LKYN metabolites in plasma suggests a relatively slow metabolism of LKYN and no or little feed-back effect of LKYN on its synthesis. The therapeutic potential of LKYN in stroke and epilepsy should be explored in future studies in humans.

AB - The kynurenine pathway (KP) is the main path for tryptophan metabolism, and it represents a multitude of potential sites for drug discovery in neuroscience, including pain, stroke, and epilepsy. L-kynurenine (LKYN), the first active metabolite in the pathway, emerges to be a prodrug targeting glutamate receptors. The safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of LKYN in humans have not been previously investigated. In an open-label, single ascending dose study, six participants received an intravenous infusion of 50, 100, and 150 µg/kg LKYN and new six participants received an intravenous infusion of 0.3, 0.5, 1, and 5 mg/kg LKYN. To compare the pharmacological effects between species, we investigated in vivo the vascular effects of LKYN in rats. In humans, LKYN was safe and well-tolerated at all dose levels examined. After infusion, LKYN plasma concentration increased significantly over time 3.23 ± 1.12 µg/mL (after 50 µg/kg), 4.04 ± 1.1 µg/mL (after 100 µg/kg), and 5.25 ± 1.01 µg/mL (after 150 µg/kg) (p ≤ 0.001). We observed no vascular changes after infusion compared with baseline. In rats, LKYN had no effect on HR and MAP and caused no dilation of dural and pial arteries. This first-in-human study of LKYN showed that LKYN was safe and well-tolerated after intravenous infusion up to 5 mg/kg over 20 minutes. The lack of change in LKYN metabolites in plasma suggests a relatively slow metabolism of LKYN and no or little feed-back effect of LKYN on its synthesis. The therapeutic potential of LKYN in stroke and epilepsy should be explored in future studies in humans.

KW - epilepsy

KW - glutamat

KW - kynurenic acid

KW - migraine

KW - stroke

U2 - 10.1002/prp2.741

DO - 10.1002/prp2.741

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 33682377

VL - 9

SP - e00741

JO - Pharmacology Research & Perspectives

JF - Pharmacology Research & Perspectives

SN - 2052-1707

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 65608408