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Persons with type 1 diabetes have low blood oxygen levels in the supine and standing body positions

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@article{016ad233cf9f43978301083daf1244a1,
title = "Persons with type 1 diabetes have low blood oxygen levels in the supine and standing body positions",
abstract = "INTRODUCTION: Blood oxygen saturation is low compared with healthy controls (CONs) in the supine body position in individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and has been associated with complications. Since most of daily life occurs in the upright position, it is of interest if this also applies in the standing body position. In addition, tissue oxygenation in other anatomical sites could show different patterns in T1D. Therefore, we investigated blood, arm and forehead oxygen levels in the supine and standing body positions in individuals with T1D (n=129) and CONs (n=55).RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Blood oxygen saturation was measured with pulse oximetry. Arm and forehead mixed tissue oxygen levels were measured with near-infrared spectroscopy sensors applied on the skin.RESULTS: Data are presented as least squares means±SEM and differences (95% CIs). Overall blood oxygen saturation was lower in T1D (CON: 97.6%±0.2%; T1D: 97.0%±0.1%; difference: -0.5% (95% CI -0.9% to -0.0%); p=0.034). In all participants, blood oxygen saturation increased after standing up (supine: 97.1%±0.1%; standing: 97.6%±0.2%; difference: +0.6% (95% CI 0.4% to 0.8%); p<0.001). However, the increase was smaller in T1D compared with CON (CON supine: 97.3%±0.2%; CON standing: 98.0%±0.2%; T1D supine: 96.9%±0.2%; T1D standing: 97.2%±0.1%; difference between groups in the change: -0.4% (95% CI -0.6% to -0.2%); p<0.001). Arm oxygen saturation decreased in both groups after standing and more in those with T1D. Forehead oxygen saturation decreased in both groups after standing and there were no differences between the changes when comparing the groups.CONCLUSION: Compared with CON, individuals with T1D exhibit possible detrimental patterns of tissue oxygen adaptation to standing, with preserved adaptation of forehead oxygenation. Further studies are needed to explore the consequences of these differences.",
keywords = "albuminuria, diabetes mellitus, diabetic neuropathies, hypoxia, type 1, Oxygen, Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared, Humans, Oximetry, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1",
author = "Laursen, {Jens Christian} and Clemmensen, {Kim Katrine Bjerring} and Hansen, {Christian Stevns} and Diaz, {Lars Jorge} and Marco Bordino and Groop, {Per Henrik} and Marie Frimodt-Moller and Luciano Bernardi and Peter Rossing",
note = "Funding Information: Funding The authors acknowledge the support from the Novo Nordisk Foundation (grant number NNFOC0013659): PROTON: Personalizing Treatment of Diabetic Nephropathy. Internal funding was provided by Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen. Competing interests PR has received honoraria to Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen for consultancy from AstraZeneca, Astellas, Bayer, Boehringer Ingelheim, Gilead, Novo Nordisk, Merck, Mundipharma, Sanofi, Vifor, and research support from Astra Zeneca and Novo Nordisk. P-HG has received lecture honoraria from Astellas, AstraZeneca, Boehringer Ingelheim, Eli Lilly, Elo Water, Genzyme, Medscape, MSD, Mundipharma, Novartis, Novo Nordisk, PeerVoice, Sanofi and Sciarc, and is an advisory board member of AbbVie, Astellas, AstraZeneca, Bayer, Boehringer Ingelheim, Eli Lilly, Medscape, MSD, Mundipharma, Novo Nordisk and Sanofi. Funding Information: The authors acknowledge the support from the Novo Nordisk Foundation (grant number NNFOC0013659): PROTON: Personalizing Treatment of Diabetic Nephropathy. Internal funding was provided by Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen. Publisher Copyright: {\textcopyright} Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2021. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ. Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.",
year = "2021",
month = may,
day = "31",
doi = "10.1136/bmjdrc-2020-001944",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
journal = "BMJ Open Diabetes Research and Care",
issn = "2052-4897",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Persons with type 1 diabetes have low blood oxygen levels in the supine and standing body positions

AU - Laursen, Jens Christian

AU - Clemmensen, Kim Katrine Bjerring

AU - Hansen, Christian Stevns

AU - Diaz, Lars Jorge

AU - Bordino, Marco

AU - Groop, Per Henrik

AU - Frimodt-Moller, Marie

AU - Bernardi, Luciano

AU - Rossing, Peter

N1 - Funding Information: Funding The authors acknowledge the support from the Novo Nordisk Foundation (grant number NNFOC0013659): PROTON: Personalizing Treatment of Diabetic Nephropathy. Internal funding was provided by Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen. Competing interests PR has received honoraria to Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen for consultancy from AstraZeneca, Astellas, Bayer, Boehringer Ingelheim, Gilead, Novo Nordisk, Merck, Mundipharma, Sanofi, Vifor, and research support from Astra Zeneca and Novo Nordisk. P-HG has received lecture honoraria from Astellas, AstraZeneca, Boehringer Ingelheim, Eli Lilly, Elo Water, Genzyme, Medscape, MSD, Mundipharma, Novartis, Novo Nordisk, PeerVoice, Sanofi and Sciarc, and is an advisory board member of AbbVie, Astellas, AstraZeneca, Bayer, Boehringer Ingelheim, Eli Lilly, Medscape, MSD, Mundipharma, Novo Nordisk and Sanofi. Funding Information: The authors acknowledge the support from the Novo Nordisk Foundation (grant number NNFOC0013659): PROTON: Personalizing Treatment of Diabetic Nephropathy. Internal funding was provided by Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen. Publisher Copyright: © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2021. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ. Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

PY - 2021/5/31

Y1 - 2021/5/31

N2 - INTRODUCTION: Blood oxygen saturation is low compared with healthy controls (CONs) in the supine body position in individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and has been associated with complications. Since most of daily life occurs in the upright position, it is of interest if this also applies in the standing body position. In addition, tissue oxygenation in other anatomical sites could show different patterns in T1D. Therefore, we investigated blood, arm and forehead oxygen levels in the supine and standing body positions in individuals with T1D (n=129) and CONs (n=55).RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Blood oxygen saturation was measured with pulse oximetry. Arm and forehead mixed tissue oxygen levels were measured with near-infrared spectroscopy sensors applied on the skin.RESULTS: Data are presented as least squares means±SEM and differences (95% CIs). Overall blood oxygen saturation was lower in T1D (CON: 97.6%±0.2%; T1D: 97.0%±0.1%; difference: -0.5% (95% CI -0.9% to -0.0%); p=0.034). In all participants, blood oxygen saturation increased after standing up (supine: 97.1%±0.1%; standing: 97.6%±0.2%; difference: +0.6% (95% CI 0.4% to 0.8%); p<0.001). However, the increase was smaller in T1D compared with CON (CON supine: 97.3%±0.2%; CON standing: 98.0%±0.2%; T1D supine: 96.9%±0.2%; T1D standing: 97.2%±0.1%; difference between groups in the change: -0.4% (95% CI -0.6% to -0.2%); p<0.001). Arm oxygen saturation decreased in both groups after standing and more in those with T1D. Forehead oxygen saturation decreased in both groups after standing and there were no differences between the changes when comparing the groups.CONCLUSION: Compared with CON, individuals with T1D exhibit possible detrimental patterns of tissue oxygen adaptation to standing, with preserved adaptation of forehead oxygenation. Further studies are needed to explore the consequences of these differences.

AB - INTRODUCTION: Blood oxygen saturation is low compared with healthy controls (CONs) in the supine body position in individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and has been associated with complications. Since most of daily life occurs in the upright position, it is of interest if this also applies in the standing body position. In addition, tissue oxygenation in other anatomical sites could show different patterns in T1D. Therefore, we investigated blood, arm and forehead oxygen levels in the supine and standing body positions in individuals with T1D (n=129) and CONs (n=55).RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Blood oxygen saturation was measured with pulse oximetry. Arm and forehead mixed tissue oxygen levels were measured with near-infrared spectroscopy sensors applied on the skin.RESULTS: Data are presented as least squares means±SEM and differences (95% CIs). Overall blood oxygen saturation was lower in T1D (CON: 97.6%±0.2%; T1D: 97.0%±0.1%; difference: -0.5% (95% CI -0.9% to -0.0%); p=0.034). In all participants, blood oxygen saturation increased after standing up (supine: 97.1%±0.1%; standing: 97.6%±0.2%; difference: +0.6% (95% CI 0.4% to 0.8%); p<0.001). However, the increase was smaller in T1D compared with CON (CON supine: 97.3%±0.2%; CON standing: 98.0%±0.2%; T1D supine: 96.9%±0.2%; T1D standing: 97.2%±0.1%; difference between groups in the change: -0.4% (95% CI -0.6% to -0.2%); p<0.001). Arm oxygen saturation decreased in both groups after standing and more in those with T1D. Forehead oxygen saturation decreased in both groups after standing and there were no differences between the changes when comparing the groups.CONCLUSION: Compared with CON, individuals with T1D exhibit possible detrimental patterns of tissue oxygen adaptation to standing, with preserved adaptation of forehead oxygenation. Further studies are needed to explore the consequences of these differences.

KW - albuminuria

KW - diabetes mellitus

KW - diabetic neuropathies

KW - hypoxia

KW - type 1

KW - Oxygen

KW - Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared

KW - Humans

KW - Oximetry

KW - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85107296979&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1136/bmjdrc-2020-001944

DO - 10.1136/bmjdrc-2020-001944

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 34059524

AN - SCOPUS:85107296979

VL - 9

JO - BMJ Open Diabetes Research and Care

JF - BMJ Open Diabetes Research and Care

SN - 2052-4897

IS - 1

M1 - e001944

ER -

ID: 66481794