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Peripheral venous lactate at admission is associated with in-hospital mortality, a prospective cohort study

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BACKGROUND: The prognostic value of blood lactate as a predictor of adverse outcome in the acutely ill patient is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate if a peripheral venous lactate measurement, taken at admission, is associated with in-hospital mortality in acutely ill patients with all diagnosis. Furthermore, we wanted to investigate if the test improves a triage model in terms of predicting in-hospital mortality.

METHODS: We retrieved a cohort of 2272 adult patients from a prospectively gathered acute admission database. We performed regression analysis to evaluate the association between the relevant covariates and the outcome measure: in-hospital mortality.

RESULTS: Lactate as a continuous variable was a risk for in-hospital mortality with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.40 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.25-1.57, P < 0.0001]. OR for in-hospital mortality increased with increasing lactate levels from 2.97 (95% CI 1.55-5.72, P < 0.001) for lactate between 2 mmol/l and 4 mmol/l, to 7.77 (95% CI 3.23-18.66, P < 0.0001) for lactate > 4 mmol/l. If the condition was non-compensated (i.e. pH < 7.35), OR for in-hospital mortality increased to 19.99 (7.26-55.06, P < 0.0001). Patient with a blood lactate at 4 mmol/l or more had a risk of in-hospital mortality equivalent to the patients in the most urgent triage category.

CONCLUSION: We found elevated admission peripheral venous lactate to be independently associated with in-hospital mortality in the acutely ill patient admitted to the emergency department. Patients with a lactate > 4 mmol/l at hospital admission should be considered triaged to the most urgent triage category.

Original languageEnglish
JournalActa Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica
Volume59
Issue number4
Pages (from-to)514-23
Number of pages10
ISSN0001-5172
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2015

ID: 45113035