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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Perinatal vitamin D levels are not associated with later risk of developing pediatric-onset inflammatory bowel disease: a Danish case-cohort study

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Objective Basic and epidemiologic studies on inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have suggested an association between vitamin D and IBD risk. Though, the literature on IBD - especially pediatric-onset IBD - and vitamin D is still in its cradle. We therefore wanted to examine if levels of 25(OH)D at birth were associated with increased risk of developing pediatric-onset IBD. Material and methods A case-cohort study composed of cases diagnosed with Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis or indeterminate/unclassified colitis and healthy controls. Cases and controls were matched on date of birth and were born in the period 1981-2004. Cases were diagnosed before the age of 18 years. The concentration of 25(OH)D was assessed from neonatal dried blood spots using a highly sensitive liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Odds ratios (OR) were calculated using conditional logistic regression and two-way ANOVA were used to test for season and birth year 25(OH)D variations. A total of 384 matched pairs were included in the statistical analyses. Results No significant association were found between levels of 25(OH)D and IBD risk in the adjusted model (OR [95% CI] (per 25 nmol/L increase), 1.12 [0.88; 1.42], p = 0.35). 25(OH)D levels were found to fluctuate significantly with season (p < 0.001) and year (p < 0.001). Median/Q1-Q3 values for 25(OH)D were 27.1/16.5-39.5 nmol/L for cases and 25.7/16.1-39.4 nmol/L for controls. Conclusion Our study do not suggest that a window of vulnerability exist around time of birth in regards to 25(OH)D levels and later pediatric-onset IBD risk.

Original languageEnglish
JournalScandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume51
Issue number8
Pages (from-to)927-33
Number of pages7
ISSN0036-5521
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2016

    Research areas

  • Journal Article

ID: 49149305