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Penetrating Orbital Sphenoid Sinus Trauma with a Wooden Stick: A Challenging Case Report

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@article{ed9708293d154345abc7ebb59d52ad92,
title = "Penetrating Orbital Sphenoid Sinus Trauma with a Wooden Stick: A Challenging Case Report",
abstract = "Transorbital and intra-sphenoidal traumas are relatively uncommon, can be challenging to manage, and are associated with a high risk of complications and potentially fatal outcome. Transorbital and intra-sphenoidal trauma pose a medical challenge due to close relationship to delicate and critical anatomical structures, such as the globe, optic nerve, the ophthalmic internal carotid arteries, and central nervous system. Rapid admission to a level 1 trauma center with a high surgical expertise level is essential to ensure the best possible treatment and outcome. We present a case of a 75-year-old man who had a severe orbital trauma, where a wooden foreign object penetrated the orbit into the sphenoid sinus without penetrating its posterior wall. This case is important because of the rare trauma presentation with a wooden foreign object, which can easily be missed on computed tomography. The case also illustrates the importance of close collaboration between ophthalmologists and rhinologists when challenged with severe orbital sphenoid sinus trauma.",
author = "Hansen, {Marie-Louise Uhre} and Mads Thorsberger and J{\o}rgensen, {Jesper Skovlund} and {von Buchwald}, Christian",
note = "Copyright {\textcopyright} 2020 by S. Karger AG, Basel.",
year = "2020",
month = dec,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1159/000510019",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
pages = "540--545",
journal = "Case Reports in Ophthalmology",
issn = "1663-2699",
publisher = "S.Karger AG",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Penetrating Orbital Sphenoid Sinus Trauma with a Wooden Stick

T2 - A Challenging Case Report

AU - Hansen, Marie-Louise Uhre

AU - Thorsberger, Mads

AU - Jørgensen, Jesper Skovlund

AU - von Buchwald, Christian

N1 - Copyright © 2020 by S. Karger AG, Basel.

PY - 2020/12/1

Y1 - 2020/12/1

N2 - Transorbital and intra-sphenoidal traumas are relatively uncommon, can be challenging to manage, and are associated with a high risk of complications and potentially fatal outcome. Transorbital and intra-sphenoidal trauma pose a medical challenge due to close relationship to delicate and critical anatomical structures, such as the globe, optic nerve, the ophthalmic internal carotid arteries, and central nervous system. Rapid admission to a level 1 trauma center with a high surgical expertise level is essential to ensure the best possible treatment and outcome. We present a case of a 75-year-old man who had a severe orbital trauma, where a wooden foreign object penetrated the orbit into the sphenoid sinus without penetrating its posterior wall. This case is important because of the rare trauma presentation with a wooden foreign object, which can easily be missed on computed tomography. The case also illustrates the importance of close collaboration between ophthalmologists and rhinologists when challenged with severe orbital sphenoid sinus trauma.

AB - Transorbital and intra-sphenoidal traumas are relatively uncommon, can be challenging to manage, and are associated with a high risk of complications and potentially fatal outcome. Transorbital and intra-sphenoidal trauma pose a medical challenge due to close relationship to delicate and critical anatomical structures, such as the globe, optic nerve, the ophthalmic internal carotid arteries, and central nervous system. Rapid admission to a level 1 trauma center with a high surgical expertise level is essential to ensure the best possible treatment and outcome. We present a case of a 75-year-old man who had a severe orbital trauma, where a wooden foreign object penetrated the orbit into the sphenoid sinus without penetrating its posterior wall. This case is important because of the rare trauma presentation with a wooden foreign object, which can easily be missed on computed tomography. The case also illustrates the importance of close collaboration between ophthalmologists and rhinologists when challenged with severe orbital sphenoid sinus trauma.

U2 - 10.1159/000510019

DO - 10.1159/000510019

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 33250754

VL - 11

SP - 540

EP - 545

JO - Case Reports in Ophthalmology

JF - Case Reports in Ophthalmology

SN - 1663-2699

IS - 3

ER -

ID: 61408347