Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
E-pub ahead of print

Patients with cirrhosis have elevated bone turnover but normal hepatic production of osteoprotegerin

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

DOI

  1. Lipoprotein(a) levels at birth and in early childhood: The COMPARE Study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Colonic lactulose fermentation has no impact on glucagon-like peptide-1 and peptide-YY secretion in healthy young men

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Entero-pancreatic hormone secretion, gastric emptying, and glucose absorption after frequently sampled meal tests

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Vitamin D supplementation improves fasting insulin levels and HDL cholesterol in infertile men

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  5. Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals and Risk of Testicular Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  1. Colonic lactulose fermentation has no impact on glucagon-like peptide-1 and peptide-YY secretion in healthy young men

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Combinatorial, additive and dose-dependent drug–microbiome associations

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Diurnal variation of magnesium and the mineral metabolism in patients with chronic kidney disease

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Insulin resistance is associated with multiple chemical sensitivity in a danish population-based study—DanFunD

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

CONTEXT: Severe osteodystrophy is common in patients with liver dysfunction. Markers of bone metabolism may help in early diagnosis of osteodystrophy and in understanding underlying pathophysiological mechanisms.

OBJECTIVE: To elucidate changes in bone metabolism associated with cirrhosis and to determine the route of elimination for the markers.

DESIGN: Case-control study.

SETTING: Public university hospital.

PATIENTS: Fifty-nine patients with cirrhosis (47 alcoholic and 12 non-alcoholic cirrhosis), 20 controls.

INTERVENTIONS: Participants underwent catheterization of the femoral artery, and the hepatic, kidney and femoral veins with collection of blood from all four sites.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Regional arterio-venous differences in concentrations of bone metabolism markers were determined: procollagen of type I collagen propeptide (PINP), C-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX), osteocalcin (OC), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase isoform 5b (TRAcP5b), osteoprotegerin (OPG), and sclerostin and correlated with degree of disease (Child-Pugh Classification).

RESULTS: PINP concentration was higher (median: 87.9 µg/L) in patients with cirrhosis than in controls (52.6 µg/L)(p=0.001), while hepatic extraction was lower 4.3% vs. 14.5% (p<0.001). Both CTX and TRAcP5b were higher in cirrhotic patients (340 ng/L and 3.20 U/L) than in controls (215 ng/L and 1.60 U/L)(p<0.001 and p<0.0001). Hepatic sclerostin extraction was lower in cirrhotics (14.6%) than in controls (28.7%)(p<0.0001). In both groups OPG showed a hepatic release rate (production) of 6%.

CONCLUSIONS: Patients with cirrhosis have increased bone resorption, but unaltered bone formation. Sclerostin is eliminated through the liver while OPG is produced in the liver. Bone markers may prove useful in evaluating bone turnover in cirrhosis patients.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberdgab788
JournalThe Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism
ISSN0021-972X
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 30 Oct 2021

Bibliographical note

© The Author(s) 2021. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Endocrine Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

ID: 69022526