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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Patient-reported symptoms and problems at admission to specialized palliative care improved survival prediction in 30,969 cancer patients: A nationwide register-based study

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DOI

  1. Early specialised palliative care: interventions, symptoms, problems

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Investigating the response scale of the EORTC QLQ-C30 in German cancer patients and a population survey

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Minimally important differences for the EORTC QLQ-C30 in prostate cancer clinical trials

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Size and composition of family networks of decedents: A nationwide register-based study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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BACKGROUND: Large, nationally representative studies of the association between quality of life and survival time in cancer patients in specialized palliative care are missing.

AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate whether symptoms/problems at admission to specialized palliative care were associated with survival and if the symptoms/problems may improve prediction of death within 1 week and 1 month, respectively.

SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: All cancer patients who had filled in the EORTC QLQ-C15-PAL at admission to specialized palliative care in Denmark in 2010-2017 were included through the Danish Palliative Care Database. Cox regression was used to identify clinical variables (gender, age, type of contact (inpatient vs outpatient), and cancer site) and symptoms/problems significantly associated with survival. To test whether symptoms/problems improved survival predictions, the overall accuracy (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve) for different prediction models was compared. The validity of the prediction models was tested with data on 5,508 patients admitted to palliative care in 2018.

RESULTS: The study included 30,969 patients with an average age of 68.9 years; 50% were women. Gender, age, type of contact, cancer site, and most symptoms/problems were significantly associated with survival time. The predictive value of symptoms/problems was trivial except for physical function, which clearly improved the overall accuracy for 1-week and 1-month predictions of death when added to models including only clinical variables.

CONCLUSION: Most symptoms/problems were significantly associated with survival and mainly physical function improved predictions of death. Interestingly, the predictive value of physical function was the same as all clinical variables combined (in hospice) or even higher (in palliative care teams).

Original languageEnglish
JournalPalliative Medicine
Volume34
Issue number6
Pages (from-to)795-805
Number of pages11
ISSN0269-2163
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 Jun 2020

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2020.

Copyright:
Copyright 2020 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

    Research areas

  • needs assessment, neoplasms, palliative care, quality of life, Signs and symptoms, survival, survival analyses, symptom assessment

ID: 59912571