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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Patient-reported factors associated with early arrival for stroke treatment

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@article{daec63f741af480d83c248393963f9f9,
title = "Patient-reported factors associated with early arrival for stroke treatment",
abstract = "Objective: Timely evaluation and initiation of treatment is the key for improving stroke outcomes, although minimizing the time from symptom onset to the first contact with healthcare professionals remains a challenge. We aimed to identify patient-related factors associated with early hospital arrival. Materials and methods: In this cross-sectional survey, we included patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack admitted directly to one of two noncomprehensive stroke units or transferred to the units from comprehensive stroke centers in the Capital Region of Denmark. Patient-reported factors associated with early hospital arrival were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, education, living arrangement, brain location of the stroke, stroke severity, patient-perceived symptom severity, history of prior stroke, stroke risk factors, and knowledge of stroke symptoms. Results: In total, 479 patients with acute stroke were included (median age 74 (25th–75th percentile, 64–80), 40% women), of whom 46.4% arrived within 180 min of symptom onset. Factors associated with early hospital arrival were patients or bystanders choosing emergency medical service (EMS) for the first contact with a medical professional (adjusted odds ratio (OR), 3.41; 95% confidence interval, CI [1.57, 7.35]) or the patient's perceived symptom severity above the median score of 25 on a 100-point verbal scale (adjusted OR, 2.44; 95% CI [1.57, 3.82]). Living alone reduced the likelihood of early arrival (adjusted OR, 0.53; 95% CI [0.33, 0.86]). Conclusions: Only when patients perceived symptoms as severe or when EMS was selected as the first contact, early arrival for stroke treatment was ensured.",
keywords = "prehospital emergency care, stroke, stroke knowledge, Cross-Sectional Studies, Humans, Ischemic Attack, Transient, Male, Time Factors, Stroke/therapy, Female, Aged, Emergency Medical Services, Patient Reported Outcome Measures",
author = "Eddelien, {Heidi S.} and Butt, {Jawad H.} and Amtoft, {Andr{\'e} C.} and Nielsen, {Nicholine S.K.} and Jensen, {Emilie S.} and Danielsen, {Ida M.K.} and Thomas Christensen and Danielsen, {Anne K.} and Nete Hornnes and Christina Kruuse",
note = "Funding Information: This work was supported by TrygFonden. Christina Kruuse was supported by Novo Nordisk Foundation Borregaard stipend, grant number NNF18OC0031840. Publisher Copyright: {\textcopyright} 2021 The Authors. Brain and Behavior published by Wiley Periodicals LLC Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.",
year = "2021",
month = aug,
doi = "10.1002/brb3.2225",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
pages = "e2225",
journal = "Brain and Behavior",
issn = "2162-3279",
publisher = "JohnWiley & Sons Ltd",
number = "8",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Patient-reported factors associated with early arrival for stroke treatment

AU - Eddelien, Heidi S.

AU - Butt, Jawad H.

AU - Amtoft, André C.

AU - Nielsen, Nicholine S.K.

AU - Jensen, Emilie S.

AU - Danielsen, Ida M.K.

AU - Christensen, Thomas

AU - Danielsen, Anne K.

AU - Hornnes, Nete

AU - Kruuse, Christina

N1 - Funding Information: This work was supported by TrygFonden. Christina Kruuse was supported by Novo Nordisk Foundation Borregaard stipend, grant number NNF18OC0031840. Publisher Copyright: © 2021 The Authors. Brain and Behavior published by Wiley Periodicals LLC Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

PY - 2021/8

Y1 - 2021/8

N2 - Objective: Timely evaluation and initiation of treatment is the key for improving stroke outcomes, although minimizing the time from symptom onset to the first contact with healthcare professionals remains a challenge. We aimed to identify patient-related factors associated with early hospital arrival. Materials and methods: In this cross-sectional survey, we included patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack admitted directly to one of two noncomprehensive stroke units or transferred to the units from comprehensive stroke centers in the Capital Region of Denmark. Patient-reported factors associated with early hospital arrival were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, education, living arrangement, brain location of the stroke, stroke severity, patient-perceived symptom severity, history of prior stroke, stroke risk factors, and knowledge of stroke symptoms. Results: In total, 479 patients with acute stroke were included (median age 74 (25th–75th percentile, 64–80), 40% women), of whom 46.4% arrived within 180 min of symptom onset. Factors associated with early hospital arrival were patients or bystanders choosing emergency medical service (EMS) for the first contact with a medical professional (adjusted odds ratio (OR), 3.41; 95% confidence interval, CI [1.57, 7.35]) or the patient's perceived symptom severity above the median score of 25 on a 100-point verbal scale (adjusted OR, 2.44; 95% CI [1.57, 3.82]). Living alone reduced the likelihood of early arrival (adjusted OR, 0.53; 95% CI [0.33, 0.86]). Conclusions: Only when patients perceived symptoms as severe or when EMS was selected as the first contact, early arrival for stroke treatment was ensured.

AB - Objective: Timely evaluation and initiation of treatment is the key for improving stroke outcomes, although minimizing the time from symptom onset to the first contact with healthcare professionals remains a challenge. We aimed to identify patient-related factors associated with early hospital arrival. Materials and methods: In this cross-sectional survey, we included patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack admitted directly to one of two noncomprehensive stroke units or transferred to the units from comprehensive stroke centers in the Capital Region of Denmark. Patient-reported factors associated with early hospital arrival were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, education, living arrangement, brain location of the stroke, stroke severity, patient-perceived symptom severity, history of prior stroke, stroke risk factors, and knowledge of stroke symptoms. Results: In total, 479 patients with acute stroke were included (median age 74 (25th–75th percentile, 64–80), 40% women), of whom 46.4% arrived within 180 min of symptom onset. Factors associated with early hospital arrival were patients or bystanders choosing emergency medical service (EMS) for the first contact with a medical professional (adjusted odds ratio (OR), 3.41; 95% confidence interval, CI [1.57, 7.35]) or the patient's perceived symptom severity above the median score of 25 on a 100-point verbal scale (adjusted OR, 2.44; 95% CI [1.57, 3.82]). Living alone reduced the likelihood of early arrival (adjusted OR, 0.53; 95% CI [0.33, 0.86]). Conclusions: Only when patients perceived symptoms as severe or when EMS was selected as the first contact, early arrival for stroke treatment was ensured.

KW - prehospital emergency care

KW - stroke

KW - stroke knowledge

KW - Cross-Sectional Studies

KW - Humans

KW - Ischemic Attack, Transient

KW - Male

KW - Time Factors

KW - Stroke/therapy

KW - Female

KW - Aged

KW - Emergency Medical Services

KW - Patient Reported Outcome Measures

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85107161667&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/brb3.2225

DO - 10.1002/brb3.2225

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 34087953

AN - SCOPUS:85107161667

VL - 11

SP - e2225

JO - Brain and Behavior

JF - Brain and Behavior

SN - 2162-3279

IS - 8

M1 - e2225

ER -

ID: 66270718