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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Pathology is common in subsequent visits after admission for non-specific abdominal pain

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INTRODUCTION: Although not supported by evidence, there may be a risk of overlooking pathological findings at patients' return visit after emergency admission for non-specific abdominal pain (NSAP). The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of missed acute pathology in patients primarily discharged with NSAP and re-admitted within three months.

METHODS: This was a retrospective review of hospital records within a three-month period (1 September-30 November, 2014) in a university hospital with unrestricted referral of abdominal emergency patients. Patients fulfilling the criteria for NSAP were included in the study.

RESULTS: Among the 1,474 patients admitted with acute abdominal pain, 390 (26%) were discharged with NSAP; 16% of the patients who were discharged with NSAP were re-admitted for abdominal pain. At their return visit, 39% received a verified specific diagnosis, corresponding to 6% of all patients with the NSAP diagnosis. A total of 40% of the early re-admissions of patients with NSAP were related to the biliary tract (cholelithiatis, cholangitis and cholecystitis). Co-morbidity, nausea, vomiting and increased white blood cell count at the primary admission were significantly associated with a risk of missing a specific diagnosis (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS: This study found that only 6% of the patients who were admitted for acute abdominal pain and were discharged with no diagnosis had a somatic condition. However, risk of pathological findings at the return visit was relatively high among patients discharged with NSAP.

FUNDING: none.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant.

Original languageEnglish
JournalDanish Medical Journal
Volume66
Issue number7
ISSN1603-9629
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2019

ID: 58434933