Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
E-pub ahead of print

Paternity After Treatment for Testicular Germ Cell Cancer: A Danish Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{5fcccd2c3bd54138b1e0ed1620d04539,
title = "Paternity After Treatment for Testicular Germ Cell Cancer: A Danish Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Testicular germ cell cancer (TC) incidence peaks in the reproductive age but knowledge on fertility after treatment is insufficient. The aim was to evaluate paternity after today's testicular cancer (TC) treatment.METHODS: Clinical data were extracted from the Danish Testicular Cancer database and patients were divided into four groups: 1) Surveillance; 2) Bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP); 3) BEP + post-chemotherapy retroperitoneal surgery (BEP + surgery); and 4) Abdominal radiotherapy. For each patient, 10 men matched on date of birth were randomly sampled from the normal population. Paternity was defined as date of birth of first child after TC treatment with or without the use of assisted reproductive technology (ART) and was assessed by linkage to the Danish Medical Birth Register and the Danish in vitro fertilization (IVF)-register.RESULTS: We included 4,846 unilateral TC patients and 48,456 men from the normal population. The 20 years predicted chance of obtaining fatherhood for a 30-year-old man was 39.7% in TC patients compared to 42.5 % in the normal population. The chance of obtaining fatherhood was statistically significantly decreased after BEP (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.87, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.78-0.97) and BEP + surgery (HR = 0.74 95% CI = 0.63-0.87), but not after radiotherapy (HR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.75-1.06) or surveillance (HR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.89-1.02). The risk of needing ART to obtain fatherhood was increased after all treatment modalities.CONCLUSION: The chance of obtaining fatherhood after TC treatment was substantially higher than previously reported. Patients followed on a surveillance program had a similar chance of obtaining fatherhood as non-cancerous men.",
author = "Mikkel Bandak and Allan Jensen and Christian Dehlendorff and Jakob Lauritsen and Michael Kreiberg and Thomas Wagner and Josephine Rosenvilde and Gedske Daugaard",
note = "{\textcopyright} The Author(s) 2021. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.",
year = "2021",
month = jun,
day = "28",
doi = "10.1093/jnci/djab130",
language = "English",
journal = "National Cancer Institute. Journal (Online)",
issn = "1460-2105",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Paternity After Treatment for Testicular Germ Cell Cancer

T2 - A Danish Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study

AU - Bandak, Mikkel

AU - Jensen, Allan

AU - Dehlendorff, Christian

AU - Lauritsen, Jakob

AU - Kreiberg, Michael

AU - Wagner, Thomas

AU - Rosenvilde, Josephine

AU - Daugaard, Gedske

N1 - © The Author(s) 2021. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

PY - 2021/6/28

Y1 - 2021/6/28

N2 - BACKGROUND: Testicular germ cell cancer (TC) incidence peaks in the reproductive age but knowledge on fertility after treatment is insufficient. The aim was to evaluate paternity after today's testicular cancer (TC) treatment.METHODS: Clinical data were extracted from the Danish Testicular Cancer database and patients were divided into four groups: 1) Surveillance; 2) Bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP); 3) BEP + post-chemotherapy retroperitoneal surgery (BEP + surgery); and 4) Abdominal radiotherapy. For each patient, 10 men matched on date of birth were randomly sampled from the normal population. Paternity was defined as date of birth of first child after TC treatment with or without the use of assisted reproductive technology (ART) and was assessed by linkage to the Danish Medical Birth Register and the Danish in vitro fertilization (IVF)-register.RESULTS: We included 4,846 unilateral TC patients and 48,456 men from the normal population. The 20 years predicted chance of obtaining fatherhood for a 30-year-old man was 39.7% in TC patients compared to 42.5 % in the normal population. The chance of obtaining fatherhood was statistically significantly decreased after BEP (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.87, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.78-0.97) and BEP + surgery (HR = 0.74 95% CI = 0.63-0.87), but not after radiotherapy (HR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.75-1.06) or surveillance (HR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.89-1.02). The risk of needing ART to obtain fatherhood was increased after all treatment modalities.CONCLUSION: The chance of obtaining fatherhood after TC treatment was substantially higher than previously reported. Patients followed on a surveillance program had a similar chance of obtaining fatherhood as non-cancerous men.

AB - BACKGROUND: Testicular germ cell cancer (TC) incidence peaks in the reproductive age but knowledge on fertility after treatment is insufficient. The aim was to evaluate paternity after today's testicular cancer (TC) treatment.METHODS: Clinical data were extracted from the Danish Testicular Cancer database and patients were divided into four groups: 1) Surveillance; 2) Bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP); 3) BEP + post-chemotherapy retroperitoneal surgery (BEP + surgery); and 4) Abdominal radiotherapy. For each patient, 10 men matched on date of birth were randomly sampled from the normal population. Paternity was defined as date of birth of first child after TC treatment with or without the use of assisted reproductive technology (ART) and was assessed by linkage to the Danish Medical Birth Register and the Danish in vitro fertilization (IVF)-register.RESULTS: We included 4,846 unilateral TC patients and 48,456 men from the normal population. The 20 years predicted chance of obtaining fatherhood for a 30-year-old man was 39.7% in TC patients compared to 42.5 % in the normal population. The chance of obtaining fatherhood was statistically significantly decreased after BEP (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.87, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.78-0.97) and BEP + surgery (HR = 0.74 95% CI = 0.63-0.87), but not after radiotherapy (HR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.75-1.06) or surveillance (HR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.89-1.02). The risk of needing ART to obtain fatherhood was increased after all treatment modalities.CONCLUSION: The chance of obtaining fatherhood after TC treatment was substantially higher than previously reported. Patients followed on a surveillance program had a similar chance of obtaining fatherhood as non-cancerous men.

U2 - 10.1093/jnci/djab130

DO - 10.1093/jnci/djab130

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 34180995

JO - National Cancer Institute. Journal (Online)

JF - National Cancer Institute. Journal (Online)

SN - 1460-2105

ER -

ID: 66625950