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Overweight in childhood and adolescence: Does it lead to airway hyperresponsiveness in adulthood?

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@article{eefb4844d8e741f79ea49ef369455174,
title = "Overweight in childhood and adolescence: Does it lead to airway hyperresponsiveness in adulthood?",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Obesity is increasing worldwide among children and adolescents, and has been associated with an increased incidence of asthma. However, the mechanisms underlying this association are incompletely understood.OBJECTIVE: In this cohort study we aimed to investigate whether being overweight in childhood and adolescence is associated with an increased risk of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), a hallmark of asthma, in early adulthood.METHODS: Of 527 subjects from a random population sample of children and adolescents (7-17 years) examined at baseline, a total of 184 subjects completed the follow-up visit 20 years later and were included in the present analysis. Both visits included assessment of height and weight, case history and spirometry. At both visits, bronchial provocation tests were performed using either histamine (baseline) or methacholine (follow-up). In addition, fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) was measured at follow-up.RESULTS: No significant difference in the prevalence of AHR at follow-up was found between subjects who were overweight or obese at baseline visit (n = 26) (pediatric definition, body mass index ≥ 85{\%}percentile) and normal weight subjects (n = 158) (positive bronchial provocation tests: 15.4{\%} vs. 22.2{\%}, respectively, p = 0.35). Likewise, follow-up FeNO levels did not differ significantly between subjects who were lean and those who were overweight or obese at baseline (geometric mean (95{\%} confidence interval [CI]) 15.1 (13.7, 16.6) parts per billion (ppb) versus 13.0 (10.6, 15.9) ppb, p = 0.23).CONCLUSION: In children and adolescents, being obese or overweight seems not to be associated with an increased risk of AHR or increased FeNO levels in early adulthood.",
keywords = "Journal Article",
author = "L.L Toennesen and A Bjerregaard and C Porsbjerg and Ulrik, {C S} and L Harmsen and V Backer",
year = "2018",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1080/02770903.2017.1318143",
language = "English",
volume = "55",
pages = "1--8",
journal = "Journal of Asthma",
issn = "0277-0903",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Overweight in childhood and adolescence

T2 - Does it lead to airway hyperresponsiveness in adulthood?

AU - Toennesen , L.L

AU - Bjerregaard, A

AU - Porsbjerg, C

AU - Ulrik, C S

AU - Harmsen, L

AU - Backer, V

PY - 2018/2

Y1 - 2018/2

N2 - BACKGROUND: Obesity is increasing worldwide among children and adolescents, and has been associated with an increased incidence of asthma. However, the mechanisms underlying this association are incompletely understood.OBJECTIVE: In this cohort study we aimed to investigate whether being overweight in childhood and adolescence is associated with an increased risk of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), a hallmark of asthma, in early adulthood.METHODS: Of 527 subjects from a random population sample of children and adolescents (7-17 years) examined at baseline, a total of 184 subjects completed the follow-up visit 20 years later and were included in the present analysis. Both visits included assessment of height and weight, case history and spirometry. At both visits, bronchial provocation tests were performed using either histamine (baseline) or methacholine (follow-up). In addition, fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) was measured at follow-up.RESULTS: No significant difference in the prevalence of AHR at follow-up was found between subjects who were overweight or obese at baseline visit (n = 26) (pediatric definition, body mass index ≥ 85%percentile) and normal weight subjects (n = 158) (positive bronchial provocation tests: 15.4% vs. 22.2%, respectively, p = 0.35). Likewise, follow-up FeNO levels did not differ significantly between subjects who were lean and those who were overweight or obese at baseline (geometric mean (95% confidence interval [CI]) 15.1 (13.7, 16.6) parts per billion (ppb) versus 13.0 (10.6, 15.9) ppb, p = 0.23).CONCLUSION: In children and adolescents, being obese or overweight seems not to be associated with an increased risk of AHR or increased FeNO levels in early adulthood.

AB - BACKGROUND: Obesity is increasing worldwide among children and adolescents, and has been associated with an increased incidence of asthma. However, the mechanisms underlying this association are incompletely understood.OBJECTIVE: In this cohort study we aimed to investigate whether being overweight in childhood and adolescence is associated with an increased risk of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), a hallmark of asthma, in early adulthood.METHODS: Of 527 subjects from a random population sample of children and adolescents (7-17 years) examined at baseline, a total of 184 subjects completed the follow-up visit 20 years later and were included in the present analysis. Both visits included assessment of height and weight, case history and spirometry. At both visits, bronchial provocation tests were performed using either histamine (baseline) or methacholine (follow-up). In addition, fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) was measured at follow-up.RESULTS: No significant difference in the prevalence of AHR at follow-up was found between subjects who were overweight or obese at baseline visit (n = 26) (pediatric definition, body mass index ≥ 85%percentile) and normal weight subjects (n = 158) (positive bronchial provocation tests: 15.4% vs. 22.2%, respectively, p = 0.35). Likewise, follow-up FeNO levels did not differ significantly between subjects who were lean and those who were overweight or obese at baseline (geometric mean (95% confidence interval [CI]) 15.1 (13.7, 16.6) parts per billion (ppb) versus 13.0 (10.6, 15.9) ppb, p = 0.23).CONCLUSION: In children and adolescents, being obese or overweight seems not to be associated with an increased risk of AHR or increased FeNO levels in early adulthood.

KW - Journal Article

U2 - 10.1080/02770903.2017.1318143

DO - 10.1080/02770903.2017.1318143

M3 - Journal article

VL - 55

SP - 1

EP - 8

JO - Journal of Asthma

JF - Journal of Asthma

SN - 0277-0903

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 51631542