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Operating Room Performance Improves after Proficiency-Based Virtual Reality Cataract Surgery Training

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@article{7a0ed4b53215487b9e04634e45059d34,
title = "Operating Room Performance Improves after Proficiency-Based Virtual Reality Cataract Surgery Training",
abstract = "PURPOSE: To investigate the effect of virtual reality proficiency-based training on actual cataract surgery performance. The secondary purpose of the study was to define which surgeons benefit from virtual reality training.DESIGN: Multicenter masked clinical trial.PARTICIPANTS: Eighteen cataract surgeons with different levels of experience.METHODS: Cataract surgical training on a virtual reality simulator (EyeSi) until a proficiency-based test was passed.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Technical performance in the operating room (OR) assessed by 3 independent, masked raters using a previously validated task-specific assessment tool for cataract surgery (Objective Structured Assessment of Cataract Surgical Skill). Three surgeries before and 3 surgeries after the virtual reality training were video-recorded, anonymized, and presented to the raters in random order.RESULTS: Novices (non-independently operating surgeons) and surgeons having performed fewer than 75 independent cataract surgeries showed significant improvements in the OR-32{\%} and 38{\%}, respectively-after virtual reality training (P = 0.008 and P = 0.018). More experienced cataract surgeons did not benefit from simulator training. The reliability of the assessments was high with a generalizability coefficient of 0.92 and 0.86 before and after the virtual reality training, respectively.CONCLUSIONS: Clinically relevant cataract surgical skills can be improved by proficiency-based training on a virtual reality simulator. Novices as well as surgeons with an intermediate level of experience showed improvement in OR performance score.",
author = "Thomsen, {Ann Sofia Skou} and Daniella Bach-Holm and Hadi Kj{\ae}rbo and Klavs H{\o}jgaard-Olsen and Yousif Subhi and Saleh, {George M} and Park, {Yoon Soo} and {la Cour}, Morten and Lars Konge",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2016 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1016/j.ophtha.2016.11.015",
language = "English",
volume = "124",
pages = "524--531",
journal = "Ophthalmology",
issn = "0161-6420",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Operating Room Performance Improves after Proficiency-Based Virtual Reality Cataract Surgery Training

AU - Thomsen, Ann Sofia Skou

AU - Bach-Holm, Daniella

AU - Kjærbo, Hadi

AU - Højgaard-Olsen, Klavs

AU - Subhi, Yousif

AU - Saleh, George M

AU - Park, Yoon Soo

AU - la Cour, Morten

AU - Konge, Lars

N1 - Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - PURPOSE: To investigate the effect of virtual reality proficiency-based training on actual cataract surgery performance. The secondary purpose of the study was to define which surgeons benefit from virtual reality training.DESIGN: Multicenter masked clinical trial.PARTICIPANTS: Eighteen cataract surgeons with different levels of experience.METHODS: Cataract surgical training on a virtual reality simulator (EyeSi) until a proficiency-based test was passed.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Technical performance in the operating room (OR) assessed by 3 independent, masked raters using a previously validated task-specific assessment tool for cataract surgery (Objective Structured Assessment of Cataract Surgical Skill). Three surgeries before and 3 surgeries after the virtual reality training were video-recorded, anonymized, and presented to the raters in random order.RESULTS: Novices (non-independently operating surgeons) and surgeons having performed fewer than 75 independent cataract surgeries showed significant improvements in the OR-32% and 38%, respectively-after virtual reality training (P = 0.008 and P = 0.018). More experienced cataract surgeons did not benefit from simulator training. The reliability of the assessments was high with a generalizability coefficient of 0.92 and 0.86 before and after the virtual reality training, respectively.CONCLUSIONS: Clinically relevant cataract surgical skills can be improved by proficiency-based training on a virtual reality simulator. Novices as well as surgeons with an intermediate level of experience showed improvement in OR performance score.

AB - PURPOSE: To investigate the effect of virtual reality proficiency-based training on actual cataract surgery performance. The secondary purpose of the study was to define which surgeons benefit from virtual reality training.DESIGN: Multicenter masked clinical trial.PARTICIPANTS: Eighteen cataract surgeons with different levels of experience.METHODS: Cataract surgical training on a virtual reality simulator (EyeSi) until a proficiency-based test was passed.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Technical performance in the operating room (OR) assessed by 3 independent, masked raters using a previously validated task-specific assessment tool for cataract surgery (Objective Structured Assessment of Cataract Surgical Skill). Three surgeries before and 3 surgeries after the virtual reality training were video-recorded, anonymized, and presented to the raters in random order.RESULTS: Novices (non-independently operating surgeons) and surgeons having performed fewer than 75 independent cataract surgeries showed significant improvements in the OR-32% and 38%, respectively-after virtual reality training (P = 0.008 and P = 0.018). More experienced cataract surgeons did not benefit from simulator training. The reliability of the assessments was high with a generalizability coefficient of 0.92 and 0.86 before and after the virtual reality training, respectively.CONCLUSIONS: Clinically relevant cataract surgical skills can be improved by proficiency-based training on a virtual reality simulator. Novices as well as surgeons with an intermediate level of experience showed improvement in OR performance score.

U2 - 10.1016/j.ophtha.2016.11.015

DO - 10.1016/j.ophtha.2016.11.015

M3 - Journal article

VL - 124

SP - 524

EP - 531

JO - Ophthalmology

JF - Ophthalmology

SN - 0161-6420

IS - 4

ER -

ID: 49625722