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On the road to replacing invasive testing with cell-based NIPT: five clinical cases with aneuploidies, microduplication, unbalanced structural rearrangement or mosaicism

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@article{b83f2efb0619477b954c6012ffc836e7,
title = "On the road to replacing invasive testing with cell-based NIPT: five clinical cases with aneuploidies, microduplication, unbalanced structural rearrangement or mosaicism",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: Trophoblastic fetal cells harvested from maternal blood have the capacity to be used for copy number analyses in a non-invasive prenatal test (cbNIPT). Potentially this will result in increased resolution for detection of subchromosomal aberrations due to high quality DNA not intermixed with maternal DNA. We present five selected clinical cases from first trimester pregnancies where cbNIPT was used to demonstrate a wide range of clinically relevant aberrations.METHOD: Blood samples were collected from high risk pregnancies in gestational week 12+1 to 12+5. Fetal trophoblast cells were enriched and stained using fetal cell specific antibodies. The enriched cell fraction was scanned and fetal cells were picked using a capillary based cell picking instrument. Subsequent whole genome amplification (WGA) was performed on fetal cells and the DNA was analysed blindly by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH).RESULTS: We present five cases where non-invasive cell based prenatal test results are compared with aCGH results on chorionic villus samples (CVS), demonstrating aneuploidies including mosaicism, unbalanced translocations, subchromosomal deletions or duplications.CONCLUSION: aneuploidy and subchromosomal aberrations can be detected using fetal cells harvested from maternal blood. The method has the future potential of being offered as a cell-based NIPT with large genomic coverage.",
author = "Petersen, {Olav Bj{\o}rn}",
note = "This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.",
year = "2017",
month = "10",
day = "10",
doi = "10.1002/pd.5150",
language = "English",
journal = "Prenatal Diagnosis",
issn = "0197-3851",
publisher = "John/Wiley & Sons Ltd",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - On the road to replacing invasive testing with cell-based NIPT

T2 - five clinical cases with aneuploidies, microduplication, unbalanced structural rearrangement or mosaicism

AU - Petersen, Olav Bjørn

N1 - This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

PY - 2017/10/10

Y1 - 2017/10/10

N2 - OBJECTIVE: Trophoblastic fetal cells harvested from maternal blood have the capacity to be used for copy number analyses in a non-invasive prenatal test (cbNIPT). Potentially this will result in increased resolution for detection of subchromosomal aberrations due to high quality DNA not intermixed with maternal DNA. We present five selected clinical cases from first trimester pregnancies where cbNIPT was used to demonstrate a wide range of clinically relevant aberrations.METHOD: Blood samples were collected from high risk pregnancies in gestational week 12+1 to 12+5. Fetal trophoblast cells were enriched and stained using fetal cell specific antibodies. The enriched cell fraction was scanned and fetal cells were picked using a capillary based cell picking instrument. Subsequent whole genome amplification (WGA) was performed on fetal cells and the DNA was analysed blindly by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH).RESULTS: We present five cases where non-invasive cell based prenatal test results are compared with aCGH results on chorionic villus samples (CVS), demonstrating aneuploidies including mosaicism, unbalanced translocations, subchromosomal deletions or duplications.CONCLUSION: aneuploidy and subchromosomal aberrations can be detected using fetal cells harvested from maternal blood. The method has the future potential of being offered as a cell-based NIPT with large genomic coverage.

AB - OBJECTIVE: Trophoblastic fetal cells harvested from maternal blood have the capacity to be used for copy number analyses in a non-invasive prenatal test (cbNIPT). Potentially this will result in increased resolution for detection of subchromosomal aberrations due to high quality DNA not intermixed with maternal DNA. We present five selected clinical cases from first trimester pregnancies where cbNIPT was used to demonstrate a wide range of clinically relevant aberrations.METHOD: Blood samples were collected from high risk pregnancies in gestational week 12+1 to 12+5. Fetal trophoblast cells were enriched and stained using fetal cell specific antibodies. The enriched cell fraction was scanned and fetal cells were picked using a capillary based cell picking instrument. Subsequent whole genome amplification (WGA) was performed on fetal cells and the DNA was analysed blindly by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH).RESULTS: We present five cases where non-invasive cell based prenatal test results are compared with aCGH results on chorionic villus samples (CVS), demonstrating aneuploidies including mosaicism, unbalanced translocations, subchromosomal deletions or duplications.CONCLUSION: aneuploidy and subchromosomal aberrations can be detected using fetal cells harvested from maternal blood. The method has the future potential of being offered as a cell-based NIPT with large genomic coverage.

U2 - 10.1002/pd.5150

DO - 10.1002/pd.5150

M3 - Journal article

JO - Prenatal Diagnosis

JF - Prenatal Diagnosis

SN - 0197-3851

ER -

ID: 57105424