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Omega-3 fatty acids and risk of cardiovascular disease in Inuit: First prospective cohort study

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@article{a047169b92de46ae88aa45aedee1a1c1,
title = "Omega-3 fatty acids and risk of cardiovascular disease in Inuit: First prospective cohort study",
abstract = "Background and aims: No prospective study have ever assessed if marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids protect Inuit against cardiovascular disease as claimed. It is highly relevant as cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence rates are rising concurrent with a westernization of diet. We aimed to assess the association between blood cell membrane phospholipid content of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid (EPA + DHA) on CVD risk in Inuit. Methods: We used data from a cohort of adult Greenlanders with follow-up in national registers. The main outcome was fatal and non-fatal CVD incidence among participants without previous CVD. The continuous effect of EPA + DHA was calculated as incidence rate ratios (IRRs) using Poisson regression with age as time scale, adjusting for age, sex, genetic admixture, lifestyle and dietary risk factors. Results: Out of 3095 eligible participants, 2924 were included. During a median follow-up of 9.7 years, 216 had their first CVD event (8.3 events/1000 person years). No association between EPA + DHA and CVD risk was seen, with IRR = 0.99 per percentage point EPA + DHA increase (95% CI: 0.95–1.03, p = 0.59). No association was seen with risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD) (IRR = 1.03, 95% CI: 0.97–1.09) and stroke (IRR = 0.98, 95% CI: 0.93–1.03) as separate outcomes or for intake of EPA and DHA. Conclusions: We can exclude that the CVD risk reduction is larger than 21% for individuals at the 75% EPA + DHA percentile compared to the 25% percentile. We need a larger sample size and/or longer follow-up to detect smaller effects and associations with IHD and/or stroke.",
keywords = "Arctic, Cardiovascular disease, Circumpolar, Epidemiology, Fish, Greenland, Inuit, Ischemic heart disease, n-3, Polyunsaturated fatty acid, Stroke",
author = "Senftleber, {Ninna K.} and Anders Albrechtsen and Lotte Lauritzen and Larsen, {Christina Lytken} and Peter Bjerregaard and Diaz, {Lars J.} and R{\o}nn, {Pernille F.} and J{\o}rgensen, {Marit E.}",
note = "Copyright {\textcopyright} 2020 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.",
year = "2020",
month = nov,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2020.08.032",
language = "English",
volume = "312",
pages = "28--34",
journal = "Atherosclerosis",
issn = "0021-9150",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Omega-3 fatty acids and risk of cardiovascular disease in Inuit

T2 - First prospective cohort study

AU - Senftleber, Ninna K.

AU - Albrechtsen, Anders

AU - Lauritzen, Lotte

AU - Larsen, Christina Lytken

AU - Bjerregaard, Peter

AU - Diaz, Lars J.

AU - Rønn, Pernille F.

AU - Jørgensen, Marit E.

N1 - Copyright © 2020 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

PY - 2020/11/1

Y1 - 2020/11/1

N2 - Background and aims: No prospective study have ever assessed if marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids protect Inuit against cardiovascular disease as claimed. It is highly relevant as cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence rates are rising concurrent with a westernization of diet. We aimed to assess the association between blood cell membrane phospholipid content of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid (EPA + DHA) on CVD risk in Inuit. Methods: We used data from a cohort of adult Greenlanders with follow-up in national registers. The main outcome was fatal and non-fatal CVD incidence among participants without previous CVD. The continuous effect of EPA + DHA was calculated as incidence rate ratios (IRRs) using Poisson regression with age as time scale, adjusting for age, sex, genetic admixture, lifestyle and dietary risk factors. Results: Out of 3095 eligible participants, 2924 were included. During a median follow-up of 9.7 years, 216 had their first CVD event (8.3 events/1000 person years). No association between EPA + DHA and CVD risk was seen, with IRR = 0.99 per percentage point EPA + DHA increase (95% CI: 0.95–1.03, p = 0.59). No association was seen with risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD) (IRR = 1.03, 95% CI: 0.97–1.09) and stroke (IRR = 0.98, 95% CI: 0.93–1.03) as separate outcomes or for intake of EPA and DHA. Conclusions: We can exclude that the CVD risk reduction is larger than 21% for individuals at the 75% EPA + DHA percentile compared to the 25% percentile. We need a larger sample size and/or longer follow-up to detect smaller effects and associations with IHD and/or stroke.

AB - Background and aims: No prospective study have ever assessed if marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids protect Inuit against cardiovascular disease as claimed. It is highly relevant as cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence rates are rising concurrent with a westernization of diet. We aimed to assess the association between blood cell membrane phospholipid content of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid (EPA + DHA) on CVD risk in Inuit. Methods: We used data from a cohort of adult Greenlanders with follow-up in national registers. The main outcome was fatal and non-fatal CVD incidence among participants without previous CVD. The continuous effect of EPA + DHA was calculated as incidence rate ratios (IRRs) using Poisson regression with age as time scale, adjusting for age, sex, genetic admixture, lifestyle and dietary risk factors. Results: Out of 3095 eligible participants, 2924 were included. During a median follow-up of 9.7 years, 216 had their first CVD event (8.3 events/1000 person years). No association between EPA + DHA and CVD risk was seen, with IRR = 0.99 per percentage point EPA + DHA increase (95% CI: 0.95–1.03, p = 0.59). No association was seen with risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD) (IRR = 1.03, 95% CI: 0.97–1.09) and stroke (IRR = 0.98, 95% CI: 0.93–1.03) as separate outcomes or for intake of EPA and DHA. Conclusions: We can exclude that the CVD risk reduction is larger than 21% for individuals at the 75% EPA + DHA percentile compared to the 25% percentile. We need a larger sample size and/or longer follow-up to detect smaller effects and associations with IHD and/or stroke.

KW - Arctic

KW - Cardiovascular disease

KW - Circumpolar

KW - Epidemiology

KW - Fish

KW - Greenland

KW - Inuit

KW - Ischemic heart disease

KW - n-3

KW - Polyunsaturated fatty acid

KW - Stroke

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85090863475&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2020.08.032

DO - 10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2020.08.032

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 32949835

AN - SCOPUS:85090863475

VL - 312

SP - 28

EP - 34

JO - Atherosclerosis

JF - Atherosclerosis

SN - 0021-9150

ER -

ID: 60919810