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Next-generation sequencing of whole saliva from patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome and non-Sjögren's sicca reveals comparable salivary microbiota

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Objective: To characterize and compare the salivary microbiota in patients with pSS and patients with non-Sjögren's-related sicca, and to relate the findings to their oral health status and saliva flow rates. Methods: Twenty-four patients fulfilled the 2016 classification criteria for pSS and 34 did not (non-pSS). A clinical examination included registration of decayed, missing and filled teeth/-surfaces and collection of whole saliva. The microbiota was characterized using next-generation sequencing of the V1-V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene. Data were annotated against the eHOMD database. Results: A total of 509 different bacterial taxa were identified. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups with regard to the abundance of predominant genera, bacterial diversity and relative abundance on the genus or species level. The two groups did not differ with regard to general health, including intake of xerogenic medication and polypharmacy, oral health status or unstimulated and stimulated whole saliva flow rates. Conclusion: The salivary microbiota and oral health status, as well as salivary flow rate in patients with pSS resemble that of non-pSS patients. Our findings indicate that changes in the salivary microbiota do not appear to be determined by the disease entity pSS itself.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Oral Microbiology
Volume11
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)1660566
Number of pages7
ISSN2000-2297
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

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