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Neuropsychological intervention in the acute phase: a pilot study of emotional wellbeing of relatives of patients with severe brain

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@article{ab9b76ddd27d48a784994328ed6f5838,
title = "Neuropsychological intervention in the acute phase: a pilot study of emotional wellbeing of relatives of patients with severe brain",
abstract = "Objective: This pilot study investigated the effects of acute neuropsychologicalintervention for relatives of patients withsevere brain injury.Methods: Participants were enrolled in an intervention groupcomprising 39 relatives, and a control group comprising47 relatives. The intervention consisted of supportive andpsycho-educational sessions with a neuropsychologist in theacute care setting. The intervention group completed selfreportscales in the acute setting and after the interventionat admission to sub-acute rehabilitation. The control groupcompleted the self-report scales only at admission to subacuterehabilitation. Outcome measures included selectedscales from the Symptom Checklist Revised 90 (SCL-90-R),the Short Form 36 (SF-36), and a visual analogue quality oflife scale.Results: The intervention group showed a significant decreasein anxiety scores from the acute to the sub-acute setting(t = 2.70, p = 0.010, d = 0.30), but also significantly lower RoleEmotional scores (t = 2.12, p = 0.043, d = 0.40). In the subacutesetting, an analysis of covariance model showed a borderlinesignificant difference between the intervention andthe control group on the anxiety scale (p = 0.066, d = 0.59).Conclusion: Any effects of the acute neuropsychologicalintervention were limited. Further research is needed toexplore the effects of different interventions in more homogenousand larger groups of relatives.",
author = "Anne Norup and Lars Siert and Mortensen, {Erik Lykke}",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.2340/16501977-1181",
language = "English",
volume = "45",
pages = "827–834",
journal = "Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine",
issn = "1650-1977",
publisher = "Stiftelsen Rehabiliteringsinformation",
number = "8",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Neuropsychological intervention in the acute phase

T2 - a pilot study of emotional wellbeing of relatives of patients with severe brain

AU - Norup, Anne

AU - Siert, Lars

AU - Mortensen, Erik Lykke

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Objective: This pilot study investigated the effects of acute neuropsychologicalintervention for relatives of patients withsevere brain injury.Methods: Participants were enrolled in an intervention groupcomprising 39 relatives, and a control group comprising47 relatives. The intervention consisted of supportive andpsycho-educational sessions with a neuropsychologist in theacute care setting. The intervention group completed selfreportscales in the acute setting and after the interventionat admission to sub-acute rehabilitation. The control groupcompleted the self-report scales only at admission to subacuterehabilitation. Outcome measures included selectedscales from the Symptom Checklist Revised 90 (SCL-90-R),the Short Form 36 (SF-36), and a visual analogue quality oflife scale.Results: The intervention group showed a significant decreasein anxiety scores from the acute to the sub-acute setting(t = 2.70, p = 0.010, d = 0.30), but also significantly lower RoleEmotional scores (t = 2.12, p = 0.043, d = 0.40). In the subacutesetting, an analysis of covariance model showed a borderlinesignificant difference between the intervention andthe control group on the anxiety scale (p = 0.066, d = 0.59).Conclusion: Any effects of the acute neuropsychologicalintervention were limited. Further research is needed toexplore the effects of different interventions in more homogenousand larger groups of relatives.

AB - Objective: This pilot study investigated the effects of acute neuropsychologicalintervention for relatives of patients withsevere brain injury.Methods: Participants were enrolled in an intervention groupcomprising 39 relatives, and a control group comprising47 relatives. The intervention consisted of supportive andpsycho-educational sessions with a neuropsychologist in theacute care setting. The intervention group completed selfreportscales in the acute setting and after the interventionat admission to sub-acute rehabilitation. The control groupcompleted the self-report scales only at admission to subacuterehabilitation. Outcome measures included selectedscales from the Symptom Checklist Revised 90 (SCL-90-R),the Short Form 36 (SF-36), and a visual analogue quality oflife scale.Results: The intervention group showed a significant decreasein anxiety scores from the acute to the sub-acute setting(t = 2.70, p = 0.010, d = 0.30), but also significantly lower RoleEmotional scores (t = 2.12, p = 0.043, d = 0.40). In the subacutesetting, an analysis of covariance model showed a borderlinesignificant difference between the intervention andthe control group on the anxiety scale (p = 0.066, d = 0.59).Conclusion: Any effects of the acute neuropsychologicalintervention were limited. Further research is needed toexplore the effects of different interventions in more homogenousand larger groups of relatives.

U2 - 10.2340/16501977-1181

DO - 10.2340/16501977-1181

M3 - Journal article

VL - 45

SP - 827

EP - 834

JO - Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine

JF - Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine

SN - 1650-1977

IS - 8

ER -

ID: 38982857