Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Needs for everyday life support for brain tumour patients' relatives: systematic literature review

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Patient involvement in comprehensive, complex cancer surgery: Perspectives of patients, relatives and health professionals

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Research agenda for life-threatening cancer

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Classmates motivate childhood cancer patients to participate in physical activity during treatment: A qualitative study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Angiotensinogen promoter methylation predicts bevacizumab treatment response of patients with recurrent glioblastoma

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Systemic Immune Modulation in Gliomas: Prognostic Value of Plasma IL-6, YKL-40, and Genetic Variation in YKL-40

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. ABCB1 single-nucleotide variants and survival in patients with glioblastoma treated with radiotherapy concomitant with temozolomide

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Cell-free DNA in newly diagnosed patients with glioblastoma - a clinical prospective feasibility study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations
The purpose of this paper is to undertake a review of the everyday lives and the need for support felt by relatives of adults with malignant cerebral glioma. Through electronic literature searches we identified studies with qualitative, quantitative or mixed method designs. Fourteen studies were identified. They indicated that a relative often assumes the caregiver's role, taking over responsibility for the patient's illness and survival, and that the relative is often overwhelmingly exhausted by this task. The ever-changing circumstances left the relatives fearful, anxious and apprehensive. The relatives lacked information about how to provide day-to-day care and how to manage psychoses and neuropsychiatric problems at home. Likewise, they needed help from the professionals to talk with each other about potentially reduced life expectancy. Most relatives appeared to value specialist nurse support highly, and they found support groups helpful. Relatively few studies were identified, and extant research was found to be diverse in purpose, study design and study population. The majority of the studies focused only on the parts of the relatives' everyday lives in which they were taking care of and supporting the patient. Further research focusing on the impact of the illness on different part of relative's everyday life is needed.
Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean Journal of Cancer Care
Volume20
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)33-43
Number of pages11
ISSN0961-5423
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

    Research areas

  • Activities of Daily Living, Adult, Aged, Brain Neoplasms, Caregivers, Family, Health Services Needs and Demand, Humans, Middle Aged, Social Support, Stress, Psychological

ID: 33160418