Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Natural history of abdominal aortic aneurysm: a survey of 63 patients treated nonoperatively

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

DOI

  1. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound in Vascular Surgery: Review and Update

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  2. Risk Factors for Complications after Peripheral Vascular Surgery in 3,202 Patient Procedures

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery: survival and quality of life in patients requiring prolonged postoperative intensive therapy

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. 30-day mortality in frail patients undergoing cardiac surgery: the results of the frailty in cardiac surgery (FICS) copenhagen study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Long-term Thromboembolic Risk in Patients With Postoperative Atrial Fibrillation After Left-Sided Heart Valve Surgery

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Micro-Lightguide Spectrophotometry (O2C) for Lower Limb Perfusion: Effects of Exercise Walking in Claudicants

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Pharmacokinetics of Ferric bepectate - a new intravenous iron drug for treating iron deficiency

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

During a 10-year period in which 735 patients presented with abdominal aortic aneurysms to our clinic, 63 were not offered operative treatment. The primary reason for choosing conservative treatment was concomitant diseases that increased the risk of operation. After 2 years of followup, half of the patients died, and the cumulative 5-year survival rate was 15%. Aneurysm rupture was the primary cause of death. The cumulative 5-year mortality hazard rate from rupture was 0.36, corresponding to an annual risk of rupture of 7%. The cumulative 5-year hazard rate of death from all other causes was 1.53, corresponding to an annual risk of 30%. Diameter of the aneurysm was found to be the only factor with a significant impact on the rate of rupture. The cumulative 5-year hazard rate of rupture among patients with aneurysms < 6 cm and > or = 6 cm was 0.2 and 0.6, respectively, corresponding to an annual risk of rupture of less than 5% and 10% to 15%, respectively. However, neither diameter nor other risk factors had significant influence on the time of rupture. In our opinion, once the diagnosis is confirmed the patient should be offered aneurysm resection if the general health status permits anesthesia.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAnnals of Vascular Surgery
Volume7
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)113-6
Number of pages4
ISSN0890-5096
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1993

    Research areas

  • Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal, Aortic Rupture, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Risk Factors, Survival Rate

ID: 46027368