Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Nationwide Assessment of Cause-Specific Mortality in Patients with Rosacea: A Cohort Study in Denmark

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Eruptive Melanocytic Nevi: A Review

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  2. Choosing First-Line Biologic Treatment for Moderate-to-Severe Psoriasis: What Does the Evidence Say?

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Treating Psoriasis During Pregnancy: Safety and Efficacy of Treatments

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Fragrance contact allergy: a clinical review

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Clinical Relevance of Skin Pain in Atopic Dermatitis

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Impact of Atopic Dermatitis Lesion Location on Quality of Life in Adult Patients in a Real-world Study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Prevalence and incidence of various Cancer subtypes in patients with heart failure vs matched controls

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Management of Ocular Manifestations of Atopic Dermatitis: A Consensus Meeting Using a Modified Delphi Process

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

BACKGROUND: Emerging data suggest that rosacea is associated with several comorbidities; however, the causes of mortality in patients with rosacea have not yet been investigated.

OBJECTIVE: We evaluated all-cause and cause-specific death rates in patients with rosacea in a population-based Danish cohort study.

METHODS: All Danish individuals aged ≥18 years between 1 January 1997 and 31 December 2012 with rosacea diagnosed by hospital dermatologists were linked in nationwide registers and compared with age- and sex-matched general-population subjects (1:5 ratio). Death rates were calculated per 1000 person-years, and hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated using Cox regression models.

RESULTS: The total cohort (n = 35,958) included 5993 patients with rosacea and 29,965 age- and sex-matched individuals from the general population. During the maximum 15 years of follow-up, 664 (11.1 %) patients with rosacea and 3121 (10.4 %) patients in the reference population died. The risk of all-cause mortality was similar in patients with rosacea and the reference population [HR 1.06, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.98-1.15]. Analyses of cause-specific mortality revealed a significantly increased risk of death due to gastrointestinal diseases in patients with rosacea (HR 1.95, 95 % CI 1.31-2.89), primarily related to hepatic disease. No increased risk of death due to other major disease categories, e.g. cancer, cardiovascular, neurological, or infectious diseases was observed.

CONCLUSION: We observed a significantly increased risk of death due to gastrointestinal diseases (primarily hepatic disease) in patients with rosacea; however, we found no increased risk of death due to other causes such as cardiovascular or neurological diseases. Although this does not necessarily imply a causal link, the findings underscore the association between rosacea and gastrointestinal disease, but also that rosacea may be associated with increased risk factors, including alcohol consumption.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Dermatology
Volume17
Issue number6
Pages (from-to)673-679
ISSN1175-0561
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2016

ID: 48320642