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Nasal carriage of methicillin resistant staphylococci

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Faria, Nuno A ; Conceição, Teresa ; Miragaia, Maria ; Bartels, Mette Damkjær ; de Lencastre, Hermínia ; Westh, Henrik. / Nasal carriage of methicillin resistant staphylococci. In: Microbial drug resistance (Larchmont, N.Y.). 2014 ; Vol. 20, No. 2. pp. 108-17.

Bibtex

@article{15c2853dcf5647a0a02013da3b68f869,
title = "Nasal carriage of methicillin resistant staphylococci",
abstract = "Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are believed to function as reservoirs, as well as possible sources of staphylococcal chromosome cassette mec (SCCmec) to Staphylococcus aureus, but the frequency, preferred partners, and factors promoting SCCmec transfer are not known. Such postulated in vivo genetic transfer events are likely to occur at anatomical sites such as the normal nasal mucosa, which is known to be colonized by both CoNS and coagulase positive staphylococci. In this study, we characterized S. aureus and CoNS strains colonizing the anterior nares of 67 patients in Denmark. A total of 54 patients (80%) were colonized with staphylococci that included nine different species identified by internal transcribed spacer PCR (ITS-PCR) and 16S RNA sequencing. The highest rates of colonization were found for S. epidermidis (58%) and S. aureus (39%). Methicillin resistance was present in S. aureus (53%), S. epidermidis (53%), S. haemolyticus (33%), and S. hominis (62%). Genetic backgrounds were characterized by spa typing for S. aureus and by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis for CoNS. SCCmec typing showed that SCCmec type IV (2B) was the most common in the entire collection (65%). Carriage of multiple species was detected in 20 patients (30%), 16 of whom were colonized with both S. aureus and S. epidermidis. In two cases, simultaneous carriage of different methicillin resistant species was detected. However, the strains carried different SCCmec types. Additional studies in the same epidemiological settings are warranted to identify interspecific genetic events that involve the acquisition of SCCmec by S. aureus.",
keywords = "Adult, Bacterial Typing Techniques, Carrier State, Chromosomes, Bacterial, DNA, Intergenic, Denmark, Gene Transfer, Horizontal, Humans, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Middle Aged, Nose, RNA, Ribosomal, 16S, Staphylococcal Infections, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus haemolyticus, Staphylococcus hominis",
author = "Faria, {Nuno A} and Teresa Concei{\c c}{\~a}o and Maria Miragaia and Bartels, {Mette Damkj{\ae}r} and {de Lencastre}, Herm{\'i}nia and Henrik Westh",
year = "2014",
month = apr,
doi = "10.1089/mdr.2013.0197",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
pages = "108--17",
journal = "Microbial Drug Resistance",
issn = "1076-6294",
publisher = "Mary Ann/Liebert, Inc. Publishers",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Nasal carriage of methicillin resistant staphylococci

AU - Faria, Nuno A

AU - Conceição, Teresa

AU - Miragaia, Maria

AU - Bartels, Mette Damkjær

AU - de Lencastre, Hermínia

AU - Westh, Henrik

PY - 2014/4

Y1 - 2014/4

N2 - Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are believed to function as reservoirs, as well as possible sources of staphylococcal chromosome cassette mec (SCCmec) to Staphylococcus aureus, but the frequency, preferred partners, and factors promoting SCCmec transfer are not known. Such postulated in vivo genetic transfer events are likely to occur at anatomical sites such as the normal nasal mucosa, which is known to be colonized by both CoNS and coagulase positive staphylococci. In this study, we characterized S. aureus and CoNS strains colonizing the anterior nares of 67 patients in Denmark. A total of 54 patients (80%) were colonized with staphylococci that included nine different species identified by internal transcribed spacer PCR (ITS-PCR) and 16S RNA sequencing. The highest rates of colonization were found for S. epidermidis (58%) and S. aureus (39%). Methicillin resistance was present in S. aureus (53%), S. epidermidis (53%), S. haemolyticus (33%), and S. hominis (62%). Genetic backgrounds were characterized by spa typing for S. aureus and by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis for CoNS. SCCmec typing showed that SCCmec type IV (2B) was the most common in the entire collection (65%). Carriage of multiple species was detected in 20 patients (30%), 16 of whom were colonized with both S. aureus and S. epidermidis. In two cases, simultaneous carriage of different methicillin resistant species was detected. However, the strains carried different SCCmec types. Additional studies in the same epidemiological settings are warranted to identify interspecific genetic events that involve the acquisition of SCCmec by S. aureus.

AB - Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are believed to function as reservoirs, as well as possible sources of staphylococcal chromosome cassette mec (SCCmec) to Staphylococcus aureus, but the frequency, preferred partners, and factors promoting SCCmec transfer are not known. Such postulated in vivo genetic transfer events are likely to occur at anatomical sites such as the normal nasal mucosa, which is known to be colonized by both CoNS and coagulase positive staphylococci. In this study, we characterized S. aureus and CoNS strains colonizing the anterior nares of 67 patients in Denmark. A total of 54 patients (80%) were colonized with staphylococci that included nine different species identified by internal transcribed spacer PCR (ITS-PCR) and 16S RNA sequencing. The highest rates of colonization were found for S. epidermidis (58%) and S. aureus (39%). Methicillin resistance was present in S. aureus (53%), S. epidermidis (53%), S. haemolyticus (33%), and S. hominis (62%). Genetic backgrounds were characterized by spa typing for S. aureus and by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis for CoNS. SCCmec typing showed that SCCmec type IV (2B) was the most common in the entire collection (65%). Carriage of multiple species was detected in 20 patients (30%), 16 of whom were colonized with both S. aureus and S. epidermidis. In two cases, simultaneous carriage of different methicillin resistant species was detected. However, the strains carried different SCCmec types. Additional studies in the same epidemiological settings are warranted to identify interspecific genetic events that involve the acquisition of SCCmec by S. aureus.

KW - Adult

KW - Bacterial Typing Techniques

KW - Carrier State

KW - Chromosomes, Bacterial

KW - DNA, Intergenic

KW - Denmark

KW - Gene Transfer, Horizontal

KW - Humans

KW - Infant

KW - Infant, Newborn

KW - Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Nose

KW - RNA, Ribosomal, 16S

KW - Staphylococcal Infections

KW - Staphylococcus epidermidis

KW - Staphylococcus haemolyticus

KW - Staphylococcus hominis

U2 - 10.1089/mdr.2013.0197

DO - 10.1089/mdr.2013.0197

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 24564645

VL - 20

SP - 108

EP - 117

JO - Microbial Drug Resistance

JF - Microbial Drug Resistance

SN - 1076-6294

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 44875406