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Multivitamin intake does not affect the risk of preterm and very preterm birth

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@article{af856b4dbe234f7aa5270b125b695d9f,
title = "Multivitamin intake does not affect the risk of preterm and very preterm birth",
abstract = "INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to assess the association between multivitamin intake during pregnancy and the risk of preterm birth and very preterm birth.METHODS: The study population comprised 15,629 women from the Copenhagen Pregnancy Cohort with data on pregnancy multivitamin intake during their first trimester who gave birth to singletons from October 2012 to October 2016. Data on pregnancy multivitamin intake were linked to the Medical Birth Registry to identify the birth outcome. The main outcome measures were preterm birth before 37 weeks of gestation and very preterm birth before 32 weeks of gestation.RESULTS: Among the included women, 85.6% had taken daily pregnancy multivitamins during their first trimester. We found no evidence that pregnancy multivitamin intake during the first trimester was associated with a decreased risk of preterm birth (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.01; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.77-1.33) or very preterm birth (adjusted OR = 1.06; 95% CI: 0.63-1.77). Stratification for BMI into lesser-than 25 kg/m2 and ≥ 25 kg/m2 did not alter these findings.CONCLUSIONS: Pregnancy multivitamin intake during the first trimester was not associated with a decreased risk of preterm birth or very preterm birth among women in a high-income population.FUNDING: none.TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant.",
author = "Wolf, {Hanne Trap} and Huusom, {Lene Drasbek} and Anja Pinborg and Ann Tabor and Forman, {Julie Lyng} and Hegaard, {Hanne Kristine}",
note = "Articles published in the DMJ are “open access”. This means that the articles are distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial License, which permits any non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and source are credited.",
year = "2020",
month = sep,
day = "4",
language = "English",
volume = "67",
journal = "Danish Medical Bulletin (Online)",
issn = "1603-9629",
publisher = "Almindelige Danske Laegeforening",
number = "10",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Multivitamin intake does not affect the risk of preterm and very preterm birth

AU - Wolf, Hanne Trap

AU - Huusom, Lene Drasbek

AU - Pinborg, Anja

AU - Tabor, Ann

AU - Forman, Julie Lyng

AU - Hegaard, Hanne Kristine

N1 - Articles published in the DMJ are “open access”. This means that the articles are distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial License, which permits any non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and source are credited.

PY - 2020/9/4

Y1 - 2020/9/4

N2 - INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to assess the association between multivitamin intake during pregnancy and the risk of preterm birth and very preterm birth.METHODS: The study population comprised 15,629 women from the Copenhagen Pregnancy Cohort with data on pregnancy multivitamin intake during their first trimester who gave birth to singletons from October 2012 to October 2016. Data on pregnancy multivitamin intake were linked to the Medical Birth Registry to identify the birth outcome. The main outcome measures were preterm birth before 37 weeks of gestation and very preterm birth before 32 weeks of gestation.RESULTS: Among the included women, 85.6% had taken daily pregnancy multivitamins during their first trimester. We found no evidence that pregnancy multivitamin intake during the first trimester was associated with a decreased risk of preterm birth (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.01; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.77-1.33) or very preterm birth (adjusted OR = 1.06; 95% CI: 0.63-1.77). Stratification for BMI into lesser-than 25 kg/m2 and ≥ 25 kg/m2 did not alter these findings.CONCLUSIONS: Pregnancy multivitamin intake during the first trimester was not associated with a decreased risk of preterm birth or very preterm birth among women in a high-income population.FUNDING: none.TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant.

AB - INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to assess the association between multivitamin intake during pregnancy and the risk of preterm birth and very preterm birth.METHODS: The study population comprised 15,629 women from the Copenhagen Pregnancy Cohort with data on pregnancy multivitamin intake during their first trimester who gave birth to singletons from October 2012 to October 2016. Data on pregnancy multivitamin intake were linked to the Medical Birth Registry to identify the birth outcome. The main outcome measures were preterm birth before 37 weeks of gestation and very preterm birth before 32 weeks of gestation.RESULTS: Among the included women, 85.6% had taken daily pregnancy multivitamins during their first trimester. We found no evidence that pregnancy multivitamin intake during the first trimester was associated with a decreased risk of preterm birth (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.01; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.77-1.33) or very preterm birth (adjusted OR = 1.06; 95% CI: 0.63-1.77). Stratification for BMI into lesser-than 25 kg/m2 and ≥ 25 kg/m2 did not alter these findings.CONCLUSIONS: Pregnancy multivitamin intake during the first trimester was not associated with a decreased risk of preterm birth or very preterm birth among women in a high-income population.FUNDING: none.TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant.

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 33046202

VL - 67

JO - Danish Medical Bulletin (Online)

JF - Danish Medical Bulletin (Online)

SN - 1603-9629

IS - 10

ER -

ID: 61117100