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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Multiple brown tumors caused by primary hyperparathyroidism as a differential diagnosis to multiple osteolytic bone metastases: A case report

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Brown tumors are benign osteolytic lesions, which usually respect the bone cortex. Since these lesions may resemble bone metastases, it is important to consider them as a potential differential diagnosis. They occur as a result of increased parathyroid hormone (PTH) se-cretion mainly due to primary or secondary hyperparathyroidism. We present a case of multiple osteolytic lesions incidentally found on X-ray examinations in a patient, who had a radius fracture after a low-energy trauma. Due to the suspicion of multiple bone metastases, one of them mimicking sequels after a pathological fracture in the ulna, the patient had a positron emission tomography/computed to-mography (PET/CT) and a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan performed supporting the existence of pervasive bone lesions without suggesting a primary malignancy. The blood samples showed highly elevated ionized calcium and PTH levels. Therefore, an ultrasound examination and parathyroid scintigraphy were performed, reveal-ing a hyperfunctioning parathyroid adenoma. After removal of the adenoma, the PTH level normalised and the bone changes regressed without surgical intervention.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume10
Issue number3-4
Pages (from-to)94-100
Number of pages7
ISSN1923-2861
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2020

    Research areas

  • Brown tumors, Metastasis, Osteolytic bone lesions, Parathyroid adenoma, Primary hyperparathyroidism

ID: 60800404