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Multinational study in children and adolescents with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes: association of age, ketoacidosis, HLA status, and autoantibodies on residual beta-cell function and glycemic control 12 months after diagnosis

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@article{6153c92fbe2643c79739147b7485c35c,
title = "Multinational study in children and adolescents with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes: association of age, ketoacidosis, HLA status, and autoantibodies on residual beta-cell function and glycemic control 12 months after diagnosis",
abstract = "Objective: To identify predictors of residual beta-cell function and glycemic control during the first 12 months after the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Subjects and Methods: Clinical information and blood samples were collected from 275 children. HbA1c, antibodies, HLA typing and mixed meal-stimulated C-peptide levels 1, 6, and 12 months after diagnosis were analyzed centrally. Results: Mean age at diagnosis was 9.1 yr. DKA with standard bicarbonate <15 mmol/L was associated with significantly poorer residual beta-cell function 1 (p = 0.004) and 12 months (p = 0.0003) after diagnosis. At 12 months, the decline in stimulated C-peptide levels compared with the levels at 1 month was 69{\%} in the youngest age group and 50{\%} in patients 10 yr and above (p <0.001). Stimulated C-peptide at 12 months was predicted by younger age (p <0.02) and bicarbonate levels at diagnosis (p = 0.005), and by stimulated C-peptide (p <0.0001), postmeal blood glucose (p = 0.0004), insulin antibodies (IA; p = 0.02) and glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GADA; p = 0.0004) at 1 month. HbA1c at 12 months was predicted by HbA1c at diagnosis (p <0.0001), GADA at 1 month (p = 0.01), and non-white Caucasian ethnicity (p = 0.002). Conclusions: Younger age, ketoacidosis at diagnosis, and IA and GADA 1 month after diagnosis were the strongest explanatory factors for residual beta-cell function at 12 months. Glycemic control at 12 months was influenced predominantly by ethnicity, HbA1c at diagnosis, and GADA at 1 month",
author = "H.B. Mortensen and P.G.F. Swift and R.W. Holl and P. Hougaard and Lars Hansen and H. Bjoerndalen and {de Beaufort}, C.E. and M. Knip",
year = "2010",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
pages = "218--226",
journal = "Pediatric Diabetes",
issn = "1399-543X",
publisher = "Wiley",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Multinational study in children and adolescents with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes: association of age, ketoacidosis, HLA status, and autoantibodies on residual beta-cell function and glycemic control 12 months after diagnosis

AU - Mortensen, H.B.

AU - Swift, P.G.F.

AU - Holl, R.W.

AU - Hougaard, P.

AU - Hansen, Lars

AU - Bjoerndalen, H.

AU - de Beaufort, C.E.

AU - Knip, M.

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - Objective: To identify predictors of residual beta-cell function and glycemic control during the first 12 months after the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Subjects and Methods: Clinical information and blood samples were collected from 275 children. HbA1c, antibodies, HLA typing and mixed meal-stimulated C-peptide levels 1, 6, and 12 months after diagnosis were analyzed centrally. Results: Mean age at diagnosis was 9.1 yr. DKA with standard bicarbonate <15 mmol/L was associated with significantly poorer residual beta-cell function 1 (p = 0.004) and 12 months (p = 0.0003) after diagnosis. At 12 months, the decline in stimulated C-peptide levels compared with the levels at 1 month was 69% in the youngest age group and 50% in patients 10 yr and above (p <0.001). Stimulated C-peptide at 12 months was predicted by younger age (p <0.02) and bicarbonate levels at diagnosis (p = 0.005), and by stimulated C-peptide (p <0.0001), postmeal blood glucose (p = 0.0004), insulin antibodies (IA; p = 0.02) and glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GADA; p = 0.0004) at 1 month. HbA1c at 12 months was predicted by HbA1c at diagnosis (p <0.0001), GADA at 1 month (p = 0.01), and non-white Caucasian ethnicity (p = 0.002). Conclusions: Younger age, ketoacidosis at diagnosis, and IA and GADA 1 month after diagnosis were the strongest explanatory factors for residual beta-cell function at 12 months. Glycemic control at 12 months was influenced predominantly by ethnicity, HbA1c at diagnosis, and GADA at 1 month

AB - Objective: To identify predictors of residual beta-cell function and glycemic control during the first 12 months after the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Subjects and Methods: Clinical information and blood samples were collected from 275 children. HbA1c, antibodies, HLA typing and mixed meal-stimulated C-peptide levels 1, 6, and 12 months after diagnosis were analyzed centrally. Results: Mean age at diagnosis was 9.1 yr. DKA with standard bicarbonate <15 mmol/L was associated with significantly poorer residual beta-cell function 1 (p = 0.004) and 12 months (p = 0.0003) after diagnosis. At 12 months, the decline in stimulated C-peptide levels compared with the levels at 1 month was 69% in the youngest age group and 50% in patients 10 yr and above (p <0.001). Stimulated C-peptide at 12 months was predicted by younger age (p <0.02) and bicarbonate levels at diagnosis (p = 0.005), and by stimulated C-peptide (p <0.0001), postmeal blood glucose (p = 0.0004), insulin antibodies (IA; p = 0.02) and glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GADA; p = 0.0004) at 1 month. HbA1c at 12 months was predicted by HbA1c at diagnosis (p <0.0001), GADA at 1 month (p = 0.01), and non-white Caucasian ethnicity (p = 0.002). Conclusions: Younger age, ketoacidosis at diagnosis, and IA and GADA 1 month after diagnosis were the strongest explanatory factors for residual beta-cell function at 12 months. Glycemic control at 12 months was influenced predominantly by ethnicity, HbA1c at diagnosis, and GADA at 1 month

M3 - Journal article

VL - 11

SP - 218

EP - 226

JO - Pediatric Diabetes

JF - Pediatric Diabetes

SN - 1399-543X

IS - 4

ER -

ID: 32320525