Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Mortality and complications after treatment of acute diabetic Charcot foot

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{679ee341d8b246c38dfcb303432e38c4,
title = "Mortality and complications after treatment of acute diabetic Charcot foot",
abstract = "AIMS: Charcot foot is a rare but disabling complication to diabetic neuropathy, and can cause permanent, limb-threatening deformities. The aim of this study was to investigate a population of patients a Charcot foot on a case-by-case basis, in order to assess the consequences of an acute Charcot foot and its complications.METHODS: The study was conducted a retrospective study of patients admitted to the Copenhagen Wound Healing Center between 1996 and 2015 with the diagnosis of Charcot foot (DM14.6) and diabetes mellitus type 1 or 2 (DE10.X and DE11.X). Physical and electronic records were used, and compared to data from the Danish Diabetes Registry.RESULTS: In total 392 patients were identified of which 173 were included. There were 26{\%} with type 1 diabetes (initial HbA1c 81.7 ± 21.4 mmol/mol) and 74{\%} with type 2 diabetes (initial HbA1c 66.5 ± 20.3 mmol/mol). Primary off-loading was with a removable walker in 95{\%} of the cases (average off-loading time 8.3 months). The 5-year mortality was 14{\%} with a mean survival time of 12.7 years. There was an association between lack of compliance and occurrence of foot complications, as well as between having a Charcot foot and leaving the workforce.CONCLUSION: More patients had type 1 diabetes compared to the background population, and they had a higher HbA1c than the general population of diabetes patients. A total of 67{\%} developed complications such as ulcers, while patients non-compliant to treatment did significantly worse than those being compliant. The 5-year mortality was low, 14{\%}, and comparable to diabetes patients without Charcot foot.",
author = "Jansen, {Rasmus Bo} and Bo J{\o}rgensen and Holstein, {Per E} and M{\o}ller, {Klaus Kirketerp} and Svendsen, {Ole Lander}",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.",
year = "2018",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2018.09.013",
language = "English",
volume = "32",
pages = "1141--1147",
journal = "Journal of Diabetes and its Complications",
issn = "1056-8727",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc",
number = "12",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mortality and complications after treatment of acute diabetic Charcot foot

AU - Jansen, Rasmus Bo

AU - Jørgensen, Bo

AU - Holstein, Per E

AU - Møller, Klaus Kirketerp

AU - Svendsen, Ole Lander

N1 - Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PY - 2018/12

Y1 - 2018/12

N2 - AIMS: Charcot foot is a rare but disabling complication to diabetic neuropathy, and can cause permanent, limb-threatening deformities. The aim of this study was to investigate a population of patients a Charcot foot on a case-by-case basis, in order to assess the consequences of an acute Charcot foot and its complications.METHODS: The study was conducted a retrospective study of patients admitted to the Copenhagen Wound Healing Center between 1996 and 2015 with the diagnosis of Charcot foot (DM14.6) and diabetes mellitus type 1 or 2 (DE10.X and DE11.X). Physical and electronic records were used, and compared to data from the Danish Diabetes Registry.RESULTS: In total 392 patients were identified of which 173 were included. There were 26% with type 1 diabetes (initial HbA1c 81.7 ± 21.4 mmol/mol) and 74% with type 2 diabetes (initial HbA1c 66.5 ± 20.3 mmol/mol). Primary off-loading was with a removable walker in 95% of the cases (average off-loading time 8.3 months). The 5-year mortality was 14% with a mean survival time of 12.7 years. There was an association between lack of compliance and occurrence of foot complications, as well as between having a Charcot foot and leaving the workforce.CONCLUSION: More patients had type 1 diabetes compared to the background population, and they had a higher HbA1c than the general population of diabetes patients. A total of 67% developed complications such as ulcers, while patients non-compliant to treatment did significantly worse than those being compliant. The 5-year mortality was low, 14%, and comparable to diabetes patients without Charcot foot.

AB - AIMS: Charcot foot is a rare but disabling complication to diabetic neuropathy, and can cause permanent, limb-threatening deformities. The aim of this study was to investigate a population of patients a Charcot foot on a case-by-case basis, in order to assess the consequences of an acute Charcot foot and its complications.METHODS: The study was conducted a retrospective study of patients admitted to the Copenhagen Wound Healing Center between 1996 and 2015 with the diagnosis of Charcot foot (DM14.6) and diabetes mellitus type 1 or 2 (DE10.X and DE11.X). Physical and electronic records were used, and compared to data from the Danish Diabetes Registry.RESULTS: In total 392 patients were identified of which 173 were included. There were 26% with type 1 diabetes (initial HbA1c 81.7 ± 21.4 mmol/mol) and 74% with type 2 diabetes (initial HbA1c 66.5 ± 20.3 mmol/mol). Primary off-loading was with a removable walker in 95% of the cases (average off-loading time 8.3 months). The 5-year mortality was 14% with a mean survival time of 12.7 years. There was an association between lack of compliance and occurrence of foot complications, as well as between having a Charcot foot and leaving the workforce.CONCLUSION: More patients had type 1 diabetes compared to the background population, and they had a higher HbA1c than the general population of diabetes patients. A total of 67% developed complications such as ulcers, while patients non-compliant to treatment did significantly worse than those being compliant. The 5-year mortality was low, 14%, and comparable to diabetes patients without Charcot foot.

U2 - 10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2018.09.013

DO - 10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2018.09.013

M3 - Journal article

VL - 32

SP - 1141

EP - 1147

JO - Journal of Diabetes and its Complications

JF - Journal of Diabetes and its Complications

SN - 1056-8727

IS - 12

ER -

ID: 56255934