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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Models of the venous system

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  1. A Decision Support Tool for Healthcare Professionals in the Management of Hyperphosphatemia in Hemodialysis

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  2. An information and communication technology system to detect hypoglycemia in people with type 1 diabetes

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  3. System integrational and migrational concepts and methods within healthcare.

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  1. Investigating the aetiology of adverse events following HPV vaccination with systems vaccinology

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  2. A model-based analysis of autonomic nervous function in response to the Valsalva maneuver

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  3. An optimal control approach for blood pressure regulation during head-up tilt

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  4. Cardiovascular dynamics during head-up tilt assessed via pulsatile and non-pulsatile models

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Cardiac output is largely controlled by venous return, the driving force of which is the energy remaining at the postcapillary venous site. This force is influenced by forces acting close to the right atrium, and internally or externally upon the veins along their course. Analogue models of the venous system require at least three elements: a resistor, a capacitor and an inductor, with the latter being of more importance in the venous than in the arterial system. Non-linearities must be considered in pressure/flow relations in the small venules, during venous collapse, or low flow conditions. The venous capacitance is also non-linear, but may be considered linear under certain conditions. The models have to include time varying pressure sources created by respiration and skeletal muscles, and if the description includes the upright position, the partly unidirectional flow through the venous valves has to be considered.
Original languageEnglish
Book seriesStudies in Health Technology and Informatics
Volume71
Pages (from-to)109-17
Number of pages9
ISSN0926-9630
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2000

ID: 32352158