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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
E-pub ahead of print

Mitochondrial dysfunction in adults after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

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BACKGROUND:: While preclinical studies suggest that mitochondria play a pivotal role in ischaemia-reperfusion injury, the knowledge of mitochondrial function in human out-of-hospital cardiac arrest remains scarce. The present study sought to compare oxidative phosphorylation capacity in skeletal muscle biopsies from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients to healthy controls.

METHODS:: This was a substudy of a randomised trial comparing targeted temperature management at 33°C versus 36°C for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients. Skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained from adult resuscitated comatose out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients 28 hours after initiation of targeted temperature management, i.e. at target temperature prior to rewarming, and from age-matched healthy controls. Mitochondrial function was analysed by high-resolution respirometry. Maximal sustained respiration through complex I, maximal coupled respiration through complex I and complex II and maximal electron transport system capacity was compared.

RESULTS:: A total of 20 out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients and 21 controls were included in the analysis. We found no difference in mitochondrial function between temperature allocations. We found no difference in complex I sustained respiration between out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and controls (23 (18-26) vs. 22 (19-26) pmol O2/mg/s, P=0.76), whereas coupled complex I and complex II respiration was significantly lower in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients versus controls (53 (42-59) vs. 64 (54-68) pmol O2/mg/s, P=0.01). Furthermore, electron transport system capacity was lower in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest versus controls (63 (51-69) vs. 73 (66-78) pmol O2/mg/s, P=0.005).

CONCLUSIONS:: Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation capacity in skeletal muscle biopsies was reduced in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients undergoing targeted temperature management compared to age-matched, healthy controls. The role of mitochondria as risk markers and potential targets for post-resuscitation care remains unknown.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean heart journal. Acute cardiovascular care
Pages (from-to)2048872618814700
ISSN2048-8726
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 11 Mar 2019

ID: 56874744