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Metabolic profile in patients with newly diagnosed bipolar disorder and their unaffected first-degree relatives

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OBJECTIVE: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance is twice as high in patients with bipolar disorder compared with the general population, and possibly associated with a disabling illness trajectory of bipolar disorder, an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and premature death. Despite these detrimental effects, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in patients newly diagnosed with bipolar disorder and their unaffected first-degree relatives is largely unknown.

METHODS: In a cross-sectional study of 206 patients with newly diagnosed bipolar disorder, 50 of their unaffected first-degree relatives and 109 healthy age- and sex-matched individuals, we compared the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). In patients with bipolar disorder, we further investigated illness and medication variables associated with the metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance.

RESULTS: Higher rates of metabolic syndrome (odds ratio = 3.529, 95% CI 1.378-9.041, P = 0.009) and levels of insulin resistance (B = 1.203, 95% CI 1.059-1.367, P = 0.005) were found in patients newly diagnosed with bipolar disorder, but not in their unaffected first-degree relatives compared with matched healthy individuals (data adjusted for sex and age). Most patients with bipolar disorder (94.7%) were diagnosed within the preceding 2 years, and the average illness duration, defined as time from first mood episode, was 10 years.

CONCLUSION: Our findings of elevated prevalence of metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in patients with newly diagnosed bipolar disorder highlight the importance of screening for these conditions at an early stage to employ adequate and early care reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease and premature death.

Original languageEnglish
Article number8
JournalInternational Journal of Bipolar Disorders
Volume7
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)8
ISSN2194-7511
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Apr 2019

    Research areas

  • Bipolar disorder, Co-morbidity, Insulin resistance, Metabolic syndrome X

ID: 57063390