Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Melanopsin-mediated pupillary light reflex and sleep quality in patients with normal tension glaucoma

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

DOI

  1. Pupillary light responses in type 1 and type 2 diabetics with and without retinopathy

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Reply: Is automated screening for DR indeed not yet ready as stated by Grauslund et al?

    Research output: Contribution to journalLetterResearchpeer-review

  3. Ophthalmic nepafenac use in the Netherlands and Denmark

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Human parallels to experimental myopia? A literature review on visual deprivation

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Pupillary light responses in type 1 and type 2 diabetics with and without retinopathy

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Lactate: More Than Merely a Metabolic Waste Product in the Inner Retina

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  3. Primary congenital glaucoma in Denmark, 1977-2016

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

PURPOSE: The intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) and sleep quality are impaired in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). In this study, we investigated whether ipRGCs and sleep quality were also impaired in patients with normal tension glaucoma (NTG).

METHODS: We performed pupillometry and sleep quality assessment in 15 patients with NTG and 17 healthy age-matched controls. Pupillometry protocol consisted of monocular stimulation with high illuminance (100 lux) red (633 nm, 300 cd/m2 or 15.23 log quanta/cm2 /s) and blue light (463 nm, 332 cd/m2 or 15.27 log quanta/cm2 /s) and binocular pupil measurements. Prior to light stimulation, patients were dark-adapted for 5 min. The late postillumination pupillary response (PIPRLate ) to blue light was used as marker of ipRGC activity. Sleep quality was assessed by Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) questionnaire.

RESULTS: The PIPRLate to blue light was significantly reduced in patients with NTG compared to healthy subjects (p < 0.001), indicating impairment of the melanopsin-mediated pupillary pathway. There was no significant difference in the response elicited by red light (p = 0.6). Baseline pupil diameter and pupillary constriction amplitude to both red and blue light were reduced in patients with NTG (p < 0.05). The global score in PSQI was not significantly different between healthy controls and patients with NTG, indicating normal sleep quality (p = 0.6). Furthermore, we found no correlation between sleep parameters and pupillary light reflex parameters.

CONCLUSION: Patients with NTG exhibited reduced ipRGC activity compared to healthy subjects, while no differences were observed in sleep quality.

Original languageEnglish
JournalActa Ophthalmologica (Online)
Volume98
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)65-73
Number of pages9
ISSN1755-3768
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2020

ID: 59166298