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Mechanisms of acute adductor longus injuries in male football players: a systematic visual video analysis

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Serner, Andreas ; Mosler, Andrea Britt ; Tol, Johannes L ; Bahr, Roald ; Weir, Adam. / Mechanisms of acute adductor longus injuries in male football players : a systematic visual video analysis. In: British Journal of Sports Medicine. 2019 ; Vol. 53, No. 3. pp. 158-164.

Bibtex

@article{6d02d2ca236b42a2811624e69ea0de28,
title = "Mechanisms of acute adductor longus injuries in male football players: a systematic visual video analysis",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Change of direction and kicking have been described as the main actions resulting in adductor longus injury. Video descriptions of inciting events are lacking.OBJECTIVE: Perform a standardised visual video analysis of a series of acute adductor longus injuries in football.STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional.METHODS: Video footage was reviewed by players, and assessed independently by five sports medicine professionals. Inciting events were described and categorised using standardised scoring, including playing situation, player/opponent behaviour, movement and body positions.RESULTS: Videos of acute adductor longus injuries in 17 professional male football players were analysed. Most injuries occurred in non-contact situations (71{\%}), following a quick reaction to a change in play (53{\%}). Injury actions were: change of direction (35{\%}), kicking (29{\%}), reaching (24{\%}) and jumping (12{\%}). Change of direction and reaching injuries were categorised as closed chain movements (59{\%}), characterised by hip extension and abduction with external rotation. Kicking and jumping injuries were categorised as open chain (41{\%}), characterised by a change from hip extension to hip flexion, and hip abduction to adduction, with external rotation.CONCLUSION: Acute adductor longus injuries in football occur in a variety of situations. Player actions can be categorised into closed (change of direction and reaching) and open (kicking and jumping) chain movements involving triplanar hip motion. A rapid muscle activation during a rapid muscle lengthening appears to be the fundamental injury mechanism for acute adductor longus injuries.",
keywords = "groin, muscle injury, soccer, strain, thigh, Muscle, Skeletal/injuries, Prospective Studies, Cross-Sectional Studies, Humans, Thigh, Soccer/injuries, Male, Athletes, Hip, Athletic Injuries/etiology, Young Adult, Range of Motion, Articular, Video Recording, Adult",
author = "Andreas Serner and Mosler, {Andrea Britt} and Tol, {Johannes L} and Roald Bahr and Adam Weir",
note = "{\circledC} Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2019. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.",
year = "2019",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1136/bjsports-2018-099246",
language = "English",
volume = "53",
pages = "158--164",
journal = "British Journal of Sports Medicine",
issn = "0306-3674",
publisher = "B M J Group",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mechanisms of acute adductor longus injuries in male football players

T2 - a systematic visual video analysis

AU - Serner, Andreas

AU - Mosler, Andrea Britt

AU - Tol, Johannes L

AU - Bahr, Roald

AU - Weir, Adam

N1 - © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2019. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.

PY - 2019/2

Y1 - 2019/2

N2 - BACKGROUND: Change of direction and kicking have been described as the main actions resulting in adductor longus injury. Video descriptions of inciting events are lacking.OBJECTIVE: Perform a standardised visual video analysis of a series of acute adductor longus injuries in football.STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional.METHODS: Video footage was reviewed by players, and assessed independently by five sports medicine professionals. Inciting events were described and categorised using standardised scoring, including playing situation, player/opponent behaviour, movement and body positions.RESULTS: Videos of acute adductor longus injuries in 17 professional male football players were analysed. Most injuries occurred in non-contact situations (71%), following a quick reaction to a change in play (53%). Injury actions were: change of direction (35%), kicking (29%), reaching (24%) and jumping (12%). Change of direction and reaching injuries were categorised as closed chain movements (59%), characterised by hip extension and abduction with external rotation. Kicking and jumping injuries were categorised as open chain (41%), characterised by a change from hip extension to hip flexion, and hip abduction to adduction, with external rotation.CONCLUSION: Acute adductor longus injuries in football occur in a variety of situations. Player actions can be categorised into closed (change of direction and reaching) and open (kicking and jumping) chain movements involving triplanar hip motion. A rapid muscle activation during a rapid muscle lengthening appears to be the fundamental injury mechanism for acute adductor longus injuries.

AB - BACKGROUND: Change of direction and kicking have been described as the main actions resulting in adductor longus injury. Video descriptions of inciting events are lacking.OBJECTIVE: Perform a standardised visual video analysis of a series of acute adductor longus injuries in football.STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional.METHODS: Video footage was reviewed by players, and assessed independently by five sports medicine professionals. Inciting events were described and categorised using standardised scoring, including playing situation, player/opponent behaviour, movement and body positions.RESULTS: Videos of acute adductor longus injuries in 17 professional male football players were analysed. Most injuries occurred in non-contact situations (71%), following a quick reaction to a change in play (53%). Injury actions were: change of direction (35%), kicking (29%), reaching (24%) and jumping (12%). Change of direction and reaching injuries were categorised as closed chain movements (59%), characterised by hip extension and abduction with external rotation. Kicking and jumping injuries were categorised as open chain (41%), characterised by a change from hip extension to hip flexion, and hip abduction to adduction, with external rotation.CONCLUSION: Acute adductor longus injuries in football occur in a variety of situations. Player actions can be categorised into closed (change of direction and reaching) and open (kicking and jumping) chain movements involving triplanar hip motion. A rapid muscle activation during a rapid muscle lengthening appears to be the fundamental injury mechanism for acute adductor longus injuries.

KW - groin

KW - muscle injury

KW - soccer

KW - strain

KW - thigh

KW - Muscle, Skeletal/injuries

KW - Prospective Studies

KW - Cross-Sectional Studies

KW - Humans

KW - Thigh

KW - Soccer/injuries

KW - Male

KW - Athletes

KW - Hip

KW - Athletic Injuries/etiology

KW - Young Adult

KW - Range of Motion, Articular

KW - Video Recording

KW - Adult

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85050228087&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1136/bjsports-2018-099246

DO - 10.1136/bjsports-2018-099246

M3 - Journal article

VL - 53

SP - 158

EP - 164

JO - British Journal of Sports Medicine

JF - British Journal of Sports Medicine

SN - 0306-3674

IS - 3

ER -

ID: 55384574