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Mechanisms of acute adductor longus injuries in male football players: a systematic visual video analysis

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BACKGROUND: Change of direction and kicking have been described as the main actions resulting in adductor longus injury. Video descriptions of inciting events are lacking.

OBJECTIVE: Perform a standardised visual video analysis of a series of acute adductor longus injuries in football.

STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional.

METHODS: Video footage was reviewed by players, and assessed independently by five sports medicine professionals. Inciting events were described and categorised using standardised scoring, including playing situation, player/opponent behaviour, movement and body positions.

RESULTS: Videos of acute adductor longus injuries in 17 professional male football players were analysed. Most injuries occurred in non-contact situations (71%), following a quick reaction to a change in play (53%). Injury actions were: change of direction (35%), kicking (29%), reaching (24%) and jumping (12%). Change of direction and reaching injuries were categorised as closed chain movements (59%), characterised by hip extension and abduction with external rotation. Kicking and jumping injuries were categorised as open chain (41%), characterised by a change from hip extension to hip flexion, and hip abduction to adduction, with external rotation.

CONCLUSION: Acute adductor longus injuries in football occur in a variety of situations. Player actions can be categorised into closed (change of direction and reaching) and open (kicking and jumping) chain movements involving triplanar hip motion. A rapid muscle activation during a rapid muscle lengthening appears to be the fundamental injury mechanism for acute adductor longus injuries.

Original languageEnglish
JournalBritish Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume53
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)158-164
Number of pages7
ISSN0306-3674
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2019

Bibliographical note

© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2019. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.

    Research areas

  • groin, muscle injury, soccer, strain, thigh, Muscle, Skeletal/injuries, Prospective Studies, Cross-Sectional Studies, Humans, Thigh, Soccer/injuries, Male, Athletes, Hip, Athletic Injuries/etiology, Young Adult, Range of Motion, Articular, Video Recording, Adult

ID: 55384574