Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Mechanical properties and collagen cross-linking of the patellar tendon in old and young men

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Increased respiratory neural drive and work of breathing in exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Effects of anti-inflammatory (NSAID) treatment on human tendinopathic tissue

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Effects of strict prolonged bed rest on cardiorespiratory fitness: systematic review and meta-analysis

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Regulation of blood volume in lowlanders exposed to high altitude

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  5. CORP: The assessment of total hemoglobin mass by carbon monoxide rebreathing

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  1. Maintenance of muscle strength following a one-year resistance training program in older adults

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. The influence of prolonged strength training upon muscle and fat in healthy and chronically diseased older adults

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Readmission of older acutely admitted medical patients after short term admission in Denmark - a nationwide cohort study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

Age-related loss in muscle mass and strength impairs daily life function in the elderly. However, it remains unknown whether tendon properties also deteriorate with age. Cross-linking of collagen molecules provides structural integrity to the tendon fibrils and has been shown to change with age in animals but has never been examined in humans in vivo. In this study, we examined the mechanical properties and pyridinoline and pentosidine cross-link and collagen concentrations of the patellar tendon in vivo in old (OM) and young men (YM). Seven OM (67 +/- 3 years, 86 +/- 10 kg) and 10 YM (27 +/- 2 years, 81 +/- 8 kg) with a similar physical activity level (OM 5 +/- 6 h/wk, YM 5 +/- 2 h/wk) were examined. MRI was used to assess whole tendon dimensions. Tendon mechanical properties were assessed with the use of simultaneous force and ultrasonographic measurements during ramped isometric contractions. Percutaneous tendon biopsies were taken and analyzed for hydroxylysyl pyridinoline (HP), lysyl pyridinoline (LP), pentosidine, and collagen concentrations. We found no significant differences in the dimensions or mechanical properties of the tendon between OM and YM. Collagen concentrations were lower in OM than in YM (0.49 +/- 0.27 vs. 0.73 +/- 0.14 mg/mg dry wt; P < 0.05). HP concentrations were higher in OM than in YM (898 +/- 172 vs. 645 +/- 183 mmol/mol; P < 0.05). LP concentrations were higher in OM than in YM (49 +/- 38 vs. 16 +/- 8 mmol/mol; P < 0.01), and pentosidine concentrations were higher in OM than in YM (73 +/- 13 vs. 11 +/- 2 mmol/mol; P < 0.01). These cross-sectional data raise the possibility that age may not appreciably influence the dimensions or mechanical properties of the human patellar tendon in vivo. Collagen concentration was reduced, whereas both enzymatic and nonenzymatic cross-linking of concentration was elevated in OM vs. in YM, which may be a mechanism to maintain the mechanical properties of tendon with aging.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of applied physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985)
Volume107
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)880-6
Number of pages7
ISSN8750-7587
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2009

    Research areas

  • Adult, Aged, Aging, Amino Acids, Arginine, Arm, Biomechanical Phenomena, Biopsy, Collagen, Glycosylation End Products, Advanced, Humans, Hydroxyproline, Knee, Lysine, Male, Movement, Muscle, Skeletal, Patellar Ligament, Protein-Lysine 6-Oxidase

ID: 44827368