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Measuring aniseikonia tolerance range for stereoacuity - a tool for the refractive surgeon

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@article{042e271372ac4bc0ad35ec26722e0224,
title = "Measuring aniseikonia tolerance range for stereoacuity - a tool for the refractive surgeon",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: No method exists to measure aniseikonia tolerance in stereoacuity. The brain can compensate for 2%-3% aniseikonia (i.e. 2-3 dioptres of anisometropia) without impairing stereoacuity; however, a substantial proportion of anisometropic patients experience problems caused by disruptions of sensory fusion due to surgically induced aniseikonia. We hypothesized that individual differences in tolerance to aniseikonia exist and sought to develop a method to measure aniseikonia tolerance.METHODS: A total of 21 eye-healthy phakic individuals older than 50 years of age and 11 patients awaiting clear lens extraction were included. Patients were tested with best corrected near and distance visual acuity, cover/uncover test, eye dominance test, stereoacuity threshold (TNO test), slit lamp examination and ocular coherence tomography. The stereoacuity threshold was determined with aniseikonia induced by different size lenses ranging from 1% to 9% magnification of both eyes in increments of 1%. The aniseikonia tolerance range (ATR) was defined as the percentage aniseikonia in which the stereoacuity threshold was maintained.RESULTS: We examined 32 patients with a median age of 65 (95% CI: 62-66 years), CDVA better than 6/7.5 (0.1 logMAR), and median near visual acuity better than 6/6 (0.0 logMAR). The median stereoacuity threshold was 60 arcsec (maximum 30, minimum 120). We observed large inter-individual differences in ATR: 6/31 (19%) participants had an ATR of ≤1%, 1/31 (3%) had an ATR of 1-5%, 7/31 (22%) had an ATR of 5-10%, and 17/31 (54%) had an ATR of >10%.CONCLUSION: We present a reliable method for measuring the amount of aniseikonia that a person can tolerate without impairing stereopsis. We report large inter-individual differences in tolerance of aniseikonia.",
keywords = "ametropia, aniseikonia, aniseikonia tolerance, anisometropia, cataract surgery, rule of thumb, size glasses",
author = "Therese Krarup and Ivan Nisted and Hadi Kjaerbo and Ulrik Christensen and Kiilgaard, {Jens Folke} and {la Cour}, Morten",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2020 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation.",
year = "2021",
month = feb,
doi = "10.1111/aos.14507",
language = "English",
volume = "99",
pages = "e43--e53",
journal = "Acta Ophthalmologica",
issn = "1755-375X",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Munksgaard",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Measuring aniseikonia tolerance range for stereoacuity - a tool for the refractive surgeon

AU - Krarup, Therese

AU - Nisted, Ivan

AU - Kjaerbo, Hadi

AU - Christensen, Ulrik

AU - Kiilgaard, Jens Folke

AU - la Cour, Morten

N1 - © 2020 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation.

PY - 2021/2

Y1 - 2021/2

N2 - OBJECTIVE: No method exists to measure aniseikonia tolerance in stereoacuity. The brain can compensate for 2%-3% aniseikonia (i.e. 2-3 dioptres of anisometropia) without impairing stereoacuity; however, a substantial proportion of anisometropic patients experience problems caused by disruptions of sensory fusion due to surgically induced aniseikonia. We hypothesized that individual differences in tolerance to aniseikonia exist and sought to develop a method to measure aniseikonia tolerance.METHODS: A total of 21 eye-healthy phakic individuals older than 50 years of age and 11 patients awaiting clear lens extraction were included. Patients were tested with best corrected near and distance visual acuity, cover/uncover test, eye dominance test, stereoacuity threshold (TNO test), slit lamp examination and ocular coherence tomography. The stereoacuity threshold was determined with aniseikonia induced by different size lenses ranging from 1% to 9% magnification of both eyes in increments of 1%. The aniseikonia tolerance range (ATR) was defined as the percentage aniseikonia in which the stereoacuity threshold was maintained.RESULTS: We examined 32 patients with a median age of 65 (95% CI: 62-66 years), CDVA better than 6/7.5 (0.1 logMAR), and median near visual acuity better than 6/6 (0.0 logMAR). The median stereoacuity threshold was 60 arcsec (maximum 30, minimum 120). We observed large inter-individual differences in ATR: 6/31 (19%) participants had an ATR of ≤1%, 1/31 (3%) had an ATR of 1-5%, 7/31 (22%) had an ATR of 5-10%, and 17/31 (54%) had an ATR of >10%.CONCLUSION: We present a reliable method for measuring the amount of aniseikonia that a person can tolerate without impairing stereopsis. We report large inter-individual differences in tolerance of aniseikonia.

AB - OBJECTIVE: No method exists to measure aniseikonia tolerance in stereoacuity. The brain can compensate for 2%-3% aniseikonia (i.e. 2-3 dioptres of anisometropia) without impairing stereoacuity; however, a substantial proportion of anisometropic patients experience problems caused by disruptions of sensory fusion due to surgically induced aniseikonia. We hypothesized that individual differences in tolerance to aniseikonia exist and sought to develop a method to measure aniseikonia tolerance.METHODS: A total of 21 eye-healthy phakic individuals older than 50 years of age and 11 patients awaiting clear lens extraction were included. Patients were tested with best corrected near and distance visual acuity, cover/uncover test, eye dominance test, stereoacuity threshold (TNO test), slit lamp examination and ocular coherence tomography. The stereoacuity threshold was determined with aniseikonia induced by different size lenses ranging from 1% to 9% magnification of both eyes in increments of 1%. The aniseikonia tolerance range (ATR) was defined as the percentage aniseikonia in which the stereoacuity threshold was maintained.RESULTS: We examined 32 patients with a median age of 65 (95% CI: 62-66 years), CDVA better than 6/7.5 (0.1 logMAR), and median near visual acuity better than 6/6 (0.0 logMAR). The median stereoacuity threshold was 60 arcsec (maximum 30, minimum 120). We observed large inter-individual differences in ATR: 6/31 (19%) participants had an ATR of ≤1%, 1/31 (3%) had an ATR of 1-5%, 7/31 (22%) had an ATR of 5-10%, and 17/31 (54%) had an ATR of >10%.CONCLUSION: We present a reliable method for measuring the amount of aniseikonia that a person can tolerate without impairing stereopsis. We report large inter-individual differences in tolerance of aniseikonia.

KW - ametropia

KW - aniseikonia

KW - aniseikonia tolerance

KW - anisometropia

KW - cataract surgery

KW - rule of thumb

KW - size glasses

U2 - 10.1111/aos.14507

DO - 10.1111/aos.14507

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 32558241

VL - 99

SP - e43-e53

JO - Acta Ophthalmologica

JF - Acta Ophthalmologica

SN - 1755-375X

IS - 1

ER -

ID: 61058427