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Markers of human immunodeficiency virus infection in high-risk individuals seronegative by first generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

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Pedersen, C ; Lindhardt, B O ; Lauritzen, E ; Gaub, J ; Dickmeiss, E. / Markers of human immunodeficiency virus infection in high-risk individuals seronegative by first generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In: Danish Medical Bulletin. 1989 ; Vol. 36, No. 5. pp. 490-491.

Bibtex

@article{317d7e00a6e3408cb6237bd6c39a03a5,
title = "Markers of human immunodeficiency virus infection in high-risk individuals seronegative by first generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.",
abstract = "A total of 228 stored serum samples from 140 high risk individuals was examined for serological markers of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection by second generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunoblot, and HIV antigen assay. All the samples were negative in first generation enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA). Seventy-four of the serum samples had been obtained from 40 sexual partners of HIV antibody positive individuals. Two of the samples were reactive for p24 in immunoblot, but no other markers of HIV infection were found. From 80 sexually active male homosexuals, 117 serum samples were obtained. They were all negative by the tests employed. Further, 37 serum samples from 20 seroconverters were studied. Four patients had antigenaemia 6-12 months before seroconversion was detected by first generation ELISA. Our data do not support the notion that serological signs of HIV infection are common in high risk individuals seronegative by first generation ELISA. However, HIV infection do occur in subjects negative by first generation ELISA, which emphasises the need for more sensitive screening assays and/or the use of antigen detection as part of screening in high risk individuals. The advent of second generation ELISAs has not in a substantial way reduced this demand.",
author = "C Pedersen and Lindhardt, {B O} and E Lauritzen and J Gaub and E Dickmeiss",
year = "1989",
language = "English",
volume = "36",
pages = "490--491",
journal = "Danish Medical Bulletin (Online)",
issn = "1603-9629",
publisher = "Almindelige Danske Laegeforening",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Markers of human immunodeficiency virus infection in high-risk individuals seronegative by first generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

AU - Pedersen, C

AU - Lindhardt, B O

AU - Lauritzen, E

AU - Gaub, J

AU - Dickmeiss, E

PY - 1989

Y1 - 1989

N2 - A total of 228 stored serum samples from 140 high risk individuals was examined for serological markers of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection by second generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunoblot, and HIV antigen assay. All the samples were negative in first generation enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA). Seventy-four of the serum samples had been obtained from 40 sexual partners of HIV antibody positive individuals. Two of the samples were reactive for p24 in immunoblot, but no other markers of HIV infection were found. From 80 sexually active male homosexuals, 117 serum samples were obtained. They were all negative by the tests employed. Further, 37 serum samples from 20 seroconverters were studied. Four patients had antigenaemia 6-12 months before seroconversion was detected by first generation ELISA. Our data do not support the notion that serological signs of HIV infection are common in high risk individuals seronegative by first generation ELISA. However, HIV infection do occur in subjects negative by first generation ELISA, which emphasises the need for more sensitive screening assays and/or the use of antigen detection as part of screening in high risk individuals. The advent of second generation ELISAs has not in a substantial way reduced this demand.

AB - A total of 228 stored serum samples from 140 high risk individuals was examined for serological markers of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection by second generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunoblot, and HIV antigen assay. All the samples were negative in first generation enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA). Seventy-four of the serum samples had been obtained from 40 sexual partners of HIV antibody positive individuals. Two of the samples were reactive for p24 in immunoblot, but no other markers of HIV infection were found. From 80 sexually active male homosexuals, 117 serum samples were obtained. They were all negative by the tests employed. Further, 37 serum samples from 20 seroconverters were studied. Four patients had antigenaemia 6-12 months before seroconversion was detected by first generation ELISA. Our data do not support the notion that serological signs of HIV infection are common in high risk individuals seronegative by first generation ELISA. However, HIV infection do occur in subjects negative by first generation ELISA, which emphasises the need for more sensitive screening assays and/or the use of antigen detection as part of screening in high risk individuals. The advent of second generation ELISAs has not in a substantial way reduced this demand.

M3 - Journal article

VL - 36

SP - 490

EP - 491

JO - Danish Medical Bulletin (Online)

JF - Danish Medical Bulletin (Online)

SN - 1603-9629

IS - 5

ER -

ID: 32503850