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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Markers of human immunodeficiency virus infection in high-risk individuals seronegative by first generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

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  • C Pedersen
  • B O Lindhardt
  • E Lauritzen
  • J Gaub
  • E Dickmeiss
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A total of 228 stored serum samples from 140 high risk individuals was examined for serological markers of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection by second generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunoblot, and HIV antigen assay. All the samples were negative in first generation enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA). Seventy-four of the serum samples had been obtained from 40 sexual partners of HIV antibody positive individuals. Two of the samples were reactive for p24 in immunoblot, but no other markers of HIV infection were found. From 80 sexually active male homosexuals, 117 serum samples were obtained. They were all negative by the tests employed. Further, 37 serum samples from 20 seroconverters were studied. Four patients had antigenaemia 6-12 months before seroconversion was detected by first generation ELISA. Our data do not support the notion that serological signs of HIV infection are common in high risk individuals seronegative by first generation ELISA. However, HIV infection do occur in subjects negative by first generation ELISA, which emphasises the need for more sensitive screening assays and/or the use of antigen detection as part of screening in high risk individuals. The advent of second generation ELISAs has not in a substantial way reduced this demand.
Translated title of the contributionMarkers of human immunodeficiency virus infection in high-risk individuals seronegative by first generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.
Original languageEnglish
JournalDanish Medical Bulletin
Volume36
Issue number5
Pages (from-to)490-491
Number of pages2
ISSN0907-8916
Publication statusPublished - 1989

ID: 32503850