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Mannan-binding lectin and healing of a radiation-induced chronic ulcer--a case report on mannan-binding lectin replacement therapy

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  1. Delayed two-stage breast reconstruction: The impact of radiotherapy

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  2. Microvascular reconstruction in head and neck cancer - basis for the development of an enhanced recovery protocol

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  3. Hormone replacement therapy and the risk of melanoma in post-menopausal women

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  4. Delayed two-stage breast reconstruction: The impact of radiotherapy

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Mannan-binding lectin is an important component of innate immunity, and insufficiency is associated with several clinical disorders. Recently, experimental replacement therapy with plasma-derived mannan-binding lectin has become an option. The current article presents the case of a patient with an insufficient level of mannan-binding lectin and a chronic radiation-induced ulcer following the treatment of breast cancer. After 15 months of initially conservative treatment and thereafter plastic surgery, the healing was still impaired with necrosis in the periphery of the ulcer. Immunological work-up of the patient revealed pronounced insufficiency of mannan-binding lectin. Following a 6-week experimental intravenous treatment with mannan-binding lectin purified from human plasma, that is, 0.2-0.3 mg mannan-binding lectin per kg body weight twice a week, the defect was completely healed. We suggest that deficiency of mannan-binding lectin can explain cases of otherwise unexplained impaired healing, and that replacement therapy is considered in such cases.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery (Print Edition)
Volume64
Issue number6
Pages (from-to)e146-8
ISSN1748-6815
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

    Research areas

  • Breast Neoplasms, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Injections, Intravenous, Mannose-Binding Lectin, Middle Aged, Radiation Injuries, Ulcer, Wound Healing

ID: 34772379