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Lymphoma of the eyelid

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@article{b9bc753f183b4c5fbcab4138444c2a75,
title = "Lymphoma of the eyelid",
abstract = "Lymphoma of the eyelid constitutes 5{\%} of ocular adnexal lymphoma. In previously published cases, 56{\%} of lymphomas of the eyelid are of B-cell origin and 44{\%} are of T-cell origin. The most frequent B-cell lymphomas are extranodal marginal zone lymphoma (27 cases-14{\%}) and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (18 cases-9{\%}). T-cell lymphomas are most frequently mycosis fungoides (25 cases-13{\%}), extranodal natural killer/T-cell, nasal-type lymphoma (12 cases-6{\%}), and primary cutaneous anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (12 cases-6{\%}). This distribution differs from the distribution of ocular adnexal lymphoma and that of cutaneous lymphoma. The majority of subtypes occur in elderly patients, except for lymphoblastic lymphoma of B-cell and T-cell origin and Burkitt lymphoma, which occur in children and adolescents. Several subtypes have a male predominance, including peripheral T-cell lymphoma and Burkitt lymphoma. Only lymphomatoid papulosis has a female predominance. Signs of B-cell and T-cell lymphomas are tumor and swelling of the eyelid. Ulceration and erythema occur frequently among patients with T-cell lymphoma. Radiotherapy with or without surgery is the treatment of choice for low-grade, solitary lymphomas, whereas chemotherapy with or without adjuvant treatment is the treatment of choice for high-grade or disseminated lymphomas. The majority of subtypes, especially low-grade subtypes, have a good prognosis with few recurrences or progression. Some subtypes, including mycosis fungoides, have a poorer prognosis. Extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type has an exceedingly poor prognosis.",
author = "Svendsen, {Frederik H} and Steffen Heegaard",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1016/j.survophthal.2016.11.009",
language = "English",
volume = "62",
pages = "312--331",
journal = "Survey of Ophthalmology",
issn = "0039-6257",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Lymphoma of the eyelid

AU - Svendsen, Frederik H

AU - Heegaard, Steffen

N1 - Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Lymphoma of the eyelid constitutes 5% of ocular adnexal lymphoma. In previously published cases, 56% of lymphomas of the eyelid are of B-cell origin and 44% are of T-cell origin. The most frequent B-cell lymphomas are extranodal marginal zone lymphoma (27 cases-14%) and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (18 cases-9%). T-cell lymphomas are most frequently mycosis fungoides (25 cases-13%), extranodal natural killer/T-cell, nasal-type lymphoma (12 cases-6%), and primary cutaneous anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (12 cases-6%). This distribution differs from the distribution of ocular adnexal lymphoma and that of cutaneous lymphoma. The majority of subtypes occur in elderly patients, except for lymphoblastic lymphoma of B-cell and T-cell origin and Burkitt lymphoma, which occur in children and adolescents. Several subtypes have a male predominance, including peripheral T-cell lymphoma and Burkitt lymphoma. Only lymphomatoid papulosis has a female predominance. Signs of B-cell and T-cell lymphomas are tumor and swelling of the eyelid. Ulceration and erythema occur frequently among patients with T-cell lymphoma. Radiotherapy with or without surgery is the treatment of choice for low-grade, solitary lymphomas, whereas chemotherapy with or without adjuvant treatment is the treatment of choice for high-grade or disseminated lymphomas. The majority of subtypes, especially low-grade subtypes, have a good prognosis with few recurrences or progression. Some subtypes, including mycosis fungoides, have a poorer prognosis. Extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type has an exceedingly poor prognosis.

AB - Lymphoma of the eyelid constitutes 5% of ocular adnexal lymphoma. In previously published cases, 56% of lymphomas of the eyelid are of B-cell origin and 44% are of T-cell origin. The most frequent B-cell lymphomas are extranodal marginal zone lymphoma (27 cases-14%) and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (18 cases-9%). T-cell lymphomas are most frequently mycosis fungoides (25 cases-13%), extranodal natural killer/T-cell, nasal-type lymphoma (12 cases-6%), and primary cutaneous anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (12 cases-6%). This distribution differs from the distribution of ocular adnexal lymphoma and that of cutaneous lymphoma. The majority of subtypes occur in elderly patients, except for lymphoblastic lymphoma of B-cell and T-cell origin and Burkitt lymphoma, which occur in children and adolescents. Several subtypes have a male predominance, including peripheral T-cell lymphoma and Burkitt lymphoma. Only lymphomatoid papulosis has a female predominance. Signs of B-cell and T-cell lymphomas are tumor and swelling of the eyelid. Ulceration and erythema occur frequently among patients with T-cell lymphoma. Radiotherapy with or without surgery is the treatment of choice for low-grade, solitary lymphomas, whereas chemotherapy with or without adjuvant treatment is the treatment of choice for high-grade or disseminated lymphomas. The majority of subtypes, especially low-grade subtypes, have a good prognosis with few recurrences or progression. Some subtypes, including mycosis fungoides, have a poorer prognosis. Extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type has an exceedingly poor prognosis.

U2 - 10.1016/j.survophthal.2016.11.009

DO - 10.1016/j.survophthal.2016.11.009

M3 - Journal article

VL - 62

SP - 312

EP - 331

JO - Survey of Ophthalmology

JF - Survey of Ophthalmology

SN - 0039-6257

IS - 3

ER -

ID: 49631508