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Low-dose Naltrexone Therapy for Psoriasis

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Weinstock, LB, Cottel, J, Aldridge, L & Egeberg, A 2020, 'Low-dose Naltrexone Therapy for Psoriasis' International Journal of Pharmaceutical Compounding, vol. 24, no. 2, pp. 94-96.

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Author

Weinstock, Leonard B ; Cottel, Jill ; Aldridge, Lindsey ; Egeberg, Alexander. / Low-dose Naltrexone Therapy for Psoriasis. In: International Journal of Pharmaceutical Compounding. 2020 ; Vol. 24, No. 2. pp. 94-96.

Bibtex

@article{18162a35865c43c4a97798c3c56dd8c3,
title = "Low-dose Naltrexone Therapy for Psoriasis",
abstract = "Safe, inexpensive, and convenient psoriasis therapy is desirable. Two recent case reports suggested that low-dose naltrexone is effective. Cases from our practice are presented in order to further the evidence of efficacy and safety of low-dose naltrexone in the treatment of psoriasis. Patients included 13 females, 2 males; mean age 57 years; mean psoriasis duration 16 years. Of the patients, 8 had psoriatic arthritis. In the past, 5 had completely failed and 10 had partially responded to =1 topical therapies. Patients used a self-assessed Likert scale on the effect of low-dose naltrexone on their psoriasis: 1 - worse; 2 - unchanged; 3 - slightly improved; 4 - somewhat improved; 5 - marked improvement. The response to 4.5 mg of oral naltrexone was as follows: 8/15 marked improvement; 2/15 somewhat improved; and 5/15 unchanged. Three adverse events included insomnia, diarrhea, and self-limited headache. Marked improvement was seen by 53{\%} of the 15 patients. Low-dose naltrexone regulates lymphocyte responses, reduces cytokine production, and likely reduces mast cell activity. Low-dose naltrexone is safe, inexpensive, and appears be effective in this open-label study.",
keywords = "Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Naltrexone/administration & dosage, Psoriasis, Treatment Outcome",
author = "Weinstock, {Leonard B} and Jill Cottel and Lindsey Aldridge and Alexander Egeberg",
note = "Copyright{\circledC} by International Journal of Pharmaceutical Compounding, Inc.",
year = "2020",
month = "3",
day = "21",
language = "English",
volume = "24",
pages = "94--96",
journal = "International Journal of Pharmaceutical Compounding",
issn = "1092-4221",
publisher = "International Journal of Pharmaceutical Compounding",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Low-dose Naltrexone Therapy for Psoriasis

AU - Weinstock, Leonard B

AU - Cottel, Jill

AU - Aldridge, Lindsey

AU - Egeberg, Alexander

N1 - Copyright© by International Journal of Pharmaceutical Compounding, Inc.

PY - 2020/3/21

Y1 - 2020/3/21

N2 - Safe, inexpensive, and convenient psoriasis therapy is desirable. Two recent case reports suggested that low-dose naltrexone is effective. Cases from our practice are presented in order to further the evidence of efficacy and safety of low-dose naltrexone in the treatment of psoriasis. Patients included 13 females, 2 males; mean age 57 years; mean psoriasis duration 16 years. Of the patients, 8 had psoriatic arthritis. In the past, 5 had completely failed and 10 had partially responded to =1 topical therapies. Patients used a self-assessed Likert scale on the effect of low-dose naltrexone on their psoriasis: 1 - worse; 2 - unchanged; 3 - slightly improved; 4 - somewhat improved; 5 - marked improvement. The response to 4.5 mg of oral naltrexone was as follows: 8/15 marked improvement; 2/15 somewhat improved; and 5/15 unchanged. Three adverse events included insomnia, diarrhea, and self-limited headache. Marked improvement was seen by 53% of the 15 patients. Low-dose naltrexone regulates lymphocyte responses, reduces cytokine production, and likely reduces mast cell activity. Low-dose naltrexone is safe, inexpensive, and appears be effective in this open-label study.

AB - Safe, inexpensive, and convenient psoriasis therapy is desirable. Two recent case reports suggested that low-dose naltrexone is effective. Cases from our practice are presented in order to further the evidence of efficacy and safety of low-dose naltrexone in the treatment of psoriasis. Patients included 13 females, 2 males; mean age 57 years; mean psoriasis duration 16 years. Of the patients, 8 had psoriatic arthritis. In the past, 5 had completely failed and 10 had partially responded to =1 topical therapies. Patients used a self-assessed Likert scale on the effect of low-dose naltrexone on their psoriasis: 1 - worse; 2 - unchanged; 3 - slightly improved; 4 - somewhat improved; 5 - marked improvement. The response to 4.5 mg of oral naltrexone was as follows: 8/15 marked improvement; 2/15 somewhat improved; and 5/15 unchanged. Three adverse events included insomnia, diarrhea, and self-limited headache. Marked improvement was seen by 53% of the 15 patients. Low-dose naltrexone regulates lymphocyte responses, reduces cytokine production, and likely reduces mast cell activity. Low-dose naltrexone is safe, inexpensive, and appears be effective in this open-label study.

KW - Female

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Naltrexone/administration & dosage

KW - Psoriasis

KW - Treatment Outcome

M3 - Journal article

VL - 24

SP - 94

EP - 96

JO - International Journal of Pharmaceutical Compounding

JF - International Journal of Pharmaceutical Compounding

SN - 1092-4221

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 60499155