Low Prevalence of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Greenland-A Call for Increased Focus on the Importance of Diagnosis Coding

Andreas Brix, Kristine Flagstad, Marie Balslev Backe, Michael Lynge Pedersen, Maja Hykkelbjerg Nielsen

Abstract

The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of patients diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) according to age, gender, and residence in Greenland and to investigate the associated quality of care. The study was performed as an observational cross-sectional study using data on patients diagnosed with COPD, extracted from the electronical medical record (EMR) in Greenland. The total prevalence of patients aged 20-79 years diagnosed with COPD in Greenland in 2022 was 2.2%. The prevalence was significantly higher in the capital Nuuk compared to the remaining parts of Greenland (2.4% vs. 2.0%, respectively). Significantly more women than men were diagnosed with COPD, but the lung function of men was found to be significantly reduced/impaired compared to women. The prevalence of patients aged 40 years or above was 3.8%. The quality of care was significantly higher among patients living in Nuuk compared to the remaining parts of Greenland for eight out of ten quality indicators. The prevalence of COPD in Greenland is lower than in other comparable populations and might be underestimated. Continued focus on early detection of new cases and initiatives to improve and expand monitoring of quality-of-care measurements, including both additional clinical and patient reported outcomes, are recommended.

Original languageEnglish
Article number5624
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume20
Issue number9
ISSN1661-7827
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 Apr 2023

Keywords

  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Greenland/epidemiology
  • Medical Records
  • Prevalence
  • Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/diagnosis

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Low Prevalence of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Greenland-A Call for Increased Focus on the Importance of Diagnosis Coding'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this