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Low high-density lipoprotein and increased risk of several cancers: 2 population-based cohort studies including 116,728 individuals

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@article{9bf6720e1b304d1f94deea590283a39a,
title = "Low high-density lipoprotein and increased risk of several cancers: 2 population-based cohort studies including 116,728 individuals",
abstract = "Background: Increasing evidence suggests that high-density lipoprotein (HDL) may play a role in cancer development. We tested the hypothesis that low HDL levels are associated with increased risk of cancer. Methods: Individuals from two population-based cohorts, the Copenhagen General Population Study (2003-2015, N = 107 341), and the Copenhagen City Heart Study (1991-1994, N = 9387) were followed prospectively until end of 2016 to assess low plasma HDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein A1 as risk factors for cancer using Cox proportional hazard regression. Results: During up to 25 years follow-up, we observed 8748 cancers in the Copenhagen General Population Study and 2164 in the Copenhagen City Heart Study. In the Copenhagen General Population Study and compared to individuals with HDL cholesterol ≥ 2.0 mmol/L (≥ 77 mg/dL), multivariable adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for any cancer were 1.13 (95% confidence interval 1.04-1.22) for individuals with HDL cholesterol of 1.5-1.99 mmol/L (58-77 mg/dL), 1.18 (1.08-1.30) for HDL cholesterol of 1.0-1.49 mmol/L (39-58 mg/dL), and 1.29 (1.12-1.48) for individuals with HDL cholesterol < 1.0 mmol/L (< 39 mg/dL). Correspondingly, compared to individuals with apolipoprotein A1 ≥ 190 mg/dL, HRs for any cancer were 1.06 (0.96-1.17) for individuals with apolipoprotein A1 of 160-189 mg/dL, 1.18 (1.07-1.30) for apolipoprotein A1 of 130-159 mg/dL, and 1.28 (1.13-1.46) for individuals with apolipoprotein A1 < 130 mg/dL. Among 27 cancer types, low HDL cholesterol and/or apolipoprotein A1 were associated with increased risk of multiple myeloma, myeloproliferative neoplasm, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, breast cancer, lung cancer, and nervous system cancer. Results were overall similar in women and men separately, and in the Copenhagen City Heart Study. Conclusions: Low HDL levels were associated with increased risk of several cancers. Increased risk was most pronounced for hematological and nervous system cancer, and to a minor extent for breast and respiratory cancer.",
keywords = "Apolipoprotein A1, Cancer, Epidemiology, HDL cholesterol, High-density lipoprotein",
author = "Pedersen, {Kasper M{\o}nsted} and Yunus {\c C}olak and Bojesen, {Stig Egil} and Nordestgaard, {B{\o}rge Gr{\o}nne}",
year = "2020",
month = sep,
day = "30",
doi = "10.1186/s13045-020-00963-6",
language = "English",
volume = "13",
pages = "129",
journal = "Journal of Hematology and Oncology",
issn = "1756-8722",
publisher = "BioMed Central Ltd",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Low high-density lipoprotein and increased risk of several cancers

T2 - 2 population-based cohort studies including 116,728 individuals

AU - Pedersen, Kasper Mønsted

AU - Çolak, Yunus

AU - Bojesen, Stig Egil

AU - Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne

PY - 2020/9/30

Y1 - 2020/9/30

N2 - Background: Increasing evidence suggests that high-density lipoprotein (HDL) may play a role in cancer development. We tested the hypothesis that low HDL levels are associated with increased risk of cancer. Methods: Individuals from two population-based cohorts, the Copenhagen General Population Study (2003-2015, N = 107 341), and the Copenhagen City Heart Study (1991-1994, N = 9387) were followed prospectively until end of 2016 to assess low plasma HDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein A1 as risk factors for cancer using Cox proportional hazard regression. Results: During up to 25 years follow-up, we observed 8748 cancers in the Copenhagen General Population Study and 2164 in the Copenhagen City Heart Study. In the Copenhagen General Population Study and compared to individuals with HDL cholesterol ≥ 2.0 mmol/L (≥ 77 mg/dL), multivariable adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for any cancer were 1.13 (95% confidence interval 1.04-1.22) for individuals with HDL cholesterol of 1.5-1.99 mmol/L (58-77 mg/dL), 1.18 (1.08-1.30) for HDL cholesterol of 1.0-1.49 mmol/L (39-58 mg/dL), and 1.29 (1.12-1.48) for individuals with HDL cholesterol < 1.0 mmol/L (< 39 mg/dL). Correspondingly, compared to individuals with apolipoprotein A1 ≥ 190 mg/dL, HRs for any cancer were 1.06 (0.96-1.17) for individuals with apolipoprotein A1 of 160-189 mg/dL, 1.18 (1.07-1.30) for apolipoprotein A1 of 130-159 mg/dL, and 1.28 (1.13-1.46) for individuals with apolipoprotein A1 < 130 mg/dL. Among 27 cancer types, low HDL cholesterol and/or apolipoprotein A1 were associated with increased risk of multiple myeloma, myeloproliferative neoplasm, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, breast cancer, lung cancer, and nervous system cancer. Results were overall similar in women and men separately, and in the Copenhagen City Heart Study. Conclusions: Low HDL levels were associated with increased risk of several cancers. Increased risk was most pronounced for hematological and nervous system cancer, and to a minor extent for breast and respiratory cancer.

AB - Background: Increasing evidence suggests that high-density lipoprotein (HDL) may play a role in cancer development. We tested the hypothesis that low HDL levels are associated with increased risk of cancer. Methods: Individuals from two population-based cohorts, the Copenhagen General Population Study (2003-2015, N = 107 341), and the Copenhagen City Heart Study (1991-1994, N = 9387) were followed prospectively until end of 2016 to assess low plasma HDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein A1 as risk factors for cancer using Cox proportional hazard regression. Results: During up to 25 years follow-up, we observed 8748 cancers in the Copenhagen General Population Study and 2164 in the Copenhagen City Heart Study. In the Copenhagen General Population Study and compared to individuals with HDL cholesterol ≥ 2.0 mmol/L (≥ 77 mg/dL), multivariable adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for any cancer were 1.13 (95% confidence interval 1.04-1.22) for individuals with HDL cholesterol of 1.5-1.99 mmol/L (58-77 mg/dL), 1.18 (1.08-1.30) for HDL cholesterol of 1.0-1.49 mmol/L (39-58 mg/dL), and 1.29 (1.12-1.48) for individuals with HDL cholesterol < 1.0 mmol/L (< 39 mg/dL). Correspondingly, compared to individuals with apolipoprotein A1 ≥ 190 mg/dL, HRs for any cancer were 1.06 (0.96-1.17) for individuals with apolipoprotein A1 of 160-189 mg/dL, 1.18 (1.07-1.30) for apolipoprotein A1 of 130-159 mg/dL, and 1.28 (1.13-1.46) for individuals with apolipoprotein A1 < 130 mg/dL. Among 27 cancer types, low HDL cholesterol and/or apolipoprotein A1 were associated with increased risk of multiple myeloma, myeloproliferative neoplasm, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, breast cancer, lung cancer, and nervous system cancer. Results were overall similar in women and men separately, and in the Copenhagen City Heart Study. Conclusions: Low HDL levels were associated with increased risk of several cancers. Increased risk was most pronounced for hematological and nervous system cancer, and to a minor extent for breast and respiratory cancer.

KW - Apolipoprotein A1

KW - Cancer

KW - Epidemiology

KW - HDL cholesterol

KW - High-density lipoprotein

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85092534428&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/s13045-020-00963-6

DO - 10.1186/s13045-020-00963-6

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 32998735

VL - 13

SP - 129

JO - Journal of Hematology and Oncology

JF - Journal of Hematology and Oncology

SN - 1756-8722

IS - 1

M1 - 129

ER -

ID: 60948871