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Low frequency rTMS, inhibits the antidepressive effect of ECT. A pilot study

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Harvard

Buchholtz, PE, Ashkanian, M, Hjerrild, S, Hauptmann, LK, Devantier, T, Jensen, P, Wissing, S, Thorgaard, M, Speed, M, Brund, RBK & Videbech, P 2020, 'Low frequency rTMS, inhibits the antidepressive effect of ECT. A pilot study', Acta Neuropsychiatrica, vol. 32, no. 6, pp. 328-338. https://doi.org/10.1017/neu.2020.28

APA

Buchholtz, P. E., Ashkanian, M., Hjerrild, S., Hauptmann, L. K., Devantier, T., Jensen, P., Wissing, S., Thorgaard, M., Speed, M., Brund, R. B. K., & Videbech, P. (2020). Low frequency rTMS, inhibits the antidepressive effect of ECT. A pilot study. Acta Neuropsychiatrica, 32(6), 328-338. https://doi.org/10.1017/neu.2020.28

CBE

Buchholtz PE, Ashkanian M, Hjerrild S, Hauptmann LK, Devantier T, Jensen P, Wissing S, Thorgaard M, Speed M, Brund RBK, Videbech P. 2020. Low frequency rTMS, inhibits the antidepressive effect of ECT. A pilot study. Acta Neuropsychiatrica. 32(6):328-338. https://doi.org/10.1017/neu.2020.28

MLA

Vancouver

Buchholtz PE, Ashkanian M, Hjerrild S, Hauptmann LK, Devantier T, Jensen P et al. Low frequency rTMS, inhibits the antidepressive effect of ECT. A pilot study. Acta Neuropsychiatrica. 2020 Jul 27;32(6):328-338. https://doi.org/10.1017/neu.2020.28

Author

Buchholtz, Poul Erik ; Ashkanian, Mahmoud ; Hjerrild, Simon ; Hauptmann, Line Kirstine ; Devantier, Torben ; Jensen, Paulina ; Wissing, Sanne ; Thorgaard, Mette ; Speed, Maria ; Brund, Rene Børge Korsgaard ; Videbech, Poul. / Low frequency rTMS, inhibits the antidepressive effect of ECT. A pilot study. In: Acta Neuropsychiatrica. 2020 ; Vol. 32, No. 6. pp. 328-338.

Bibtex

@article{2606101cc7064e82942ac67c568fe9c9,
title = "Low frequency rTMS, inhibits the antidepressive effect of ECT. A pilot study",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: Low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the prefrontal cortex has been shown to have a statistically and clinically significant anti-depressant effect. The present pilot study was carried out to investigate if right prefrontal low-frequency rTMS as an add-on to electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) accelerates the anti-depressant effect and reduces cognitive side effects.METHODS: In this randomised, controlled, double-blind study, thirty-five patients with major depression were allocated to ECT+placebo or ECT+low-frequency right prefrontal rTMS. The severity of depression was evaluated during the course using the Hamilton scale for depression (the 17-item as well as the 6-item scale) and the major depression inventory (MDI). Furthermore, neuropsychological assessment of cognitive function was carried out.RESULTS: The study revealed no significant difference between the two groups for any of the outcomes, but with a visible trend to lower scores for MDI after treatment in the placebo group. The negative impact of ECT on neurocognitive functions was short-lived, and scores on logical memory were significantly improved compared to baseline 4 weeks after last treatment. The ECT-rTMS group revealed generally less impairment of cognitive functions than the ECT-placebo group.CONCLUSION: The addition of low-frequency rTMS as an add-on to ECT treatment did not result in an accelerated response. On the contrary, the results suggest that low-frequency rTMS could inhibit the anti-depressant effect of ECT.",
keywords = "Health Sciences, depression, Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), Keywords:, Low frequency transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), Randomized trial",
author = "Buchholtz, {Poul Erik} and Mahmoud Ashkanian and Simon Hjerrild and Hauptmann, {Line Kirstine} and Torben Devantier and Paulina Jensen and Sanne Wissing and Mette Thorgaard and Maria Speed and Brund, {Rene B{\o}rge Korsgaard} and Poul Videbech",
year = "2020",
month = jul,
day = "27",
doi = "10.1017/neu.2020.28",
language = "English",
volume = "32",
pages = "328--338",
journal = "Acta Neuropsychiatrica (Online)",
issn = "1601-5215",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Low frequency rTMS, inhibits the antidepressive effect of ECT. A pilot study

AU - Buchholtz, Poul Erik

AU - Ashkanian, Mahmoud

AU - Hjerrild, Simon

AU - Hauptmann, Line Kirstine

AU - Devantier, Torben

AU - Jensen, Paulina

AU - Wissing, Sanne

AU - Thorgaard, Mette

AU - Speed, Maria

AU - Brund, Rene Børge Korsgaard

AU - Videbech, Poul

PY - 2020/7/27

Y1 - 2020/7/27

N2 - OBJECTIVE: Low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the prefrontal cortex has been shown to have a statistically and clinically significant anti-depressant effect. The present pilot study was carried out to investigate if right prefrontal low-frequency rTMS as an add-on to electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) accelerates the anti-depressant effect and reduces cognitive side effects.METHODS: In this randomised, controlled, double-blind study, thirty-five patients with major depression were allocated to ECT+placebo or ECT+low-frequency right prefrontal rTMS. The severity of depression was evaluated during the course using the Hamilton scale for depression (the 17-item as well as the 6-item scale) and the major depression inventory (MDI). Furthermore, neuropsychological assessment of cognitive function was carried out.RESULTS: The study revealed no significant difference between the two groups for any of the outcomes, but with a visible trend to lower scores for MDI after treatment in the placebo group. The negative impact of ECT on neurocognitive functions was short-lived, and scores on logical memory were significantly improved compared to baseline 4 weeks after last treatment. The ECT-rTMS group revealed generally less impairment of cognitive functions than the ECT-placebo group.CONCLUSION: The addition of low-frequency rTMS as an add-on to ECT treatment did not result in an accelerated response. On the contrary, the results suggest that low-frequency rTMS could inhibit the anti-depressant effect of ECT.

AB - OBJECTIVE: Low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the prefrontal cortex has been shown to have a statistically and clinically significant anti-depressant effect. The present pilot study was carried out to investigate if right prefrontal low-frequency rTMS as an add-on to electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) accelerates the anti-depressant effect and reduces cognitive side effects.METHODS: In this randomised, controlled, double-blind study, thirty-five patients with major depression were allocated to ECT+placebo or ECT+low-frequency right prefrontal rTMS. The severity of depression was evaluated during the course using the Hamilton scale for depression (the 17-item as well as the 6-item scale) and the major depression inventory (MDI). Furthermore, neuropsychological assessment of cognitive function was carried out.RESULTS: The study revealed no significant difference between the two groups for any of the outcomes, but with a visible trend to lower scores for MDI after treatment in the placebo group. The negative impact of ECT on neurocognitive functions was short-lived, and scores on logical memory were significantly improved compared to baseline 4 weeks after last treatment. The ECT-rTMS group revealed generally less impairment of cognitive functions than the ECT-placebo group.CONCLUSION: The addition of low-frequency rTMS as an add-on to ECT treatment did not result in an accelerated response. On the contrary, the results suggest that low-frequency rTMS could inhibit the anti-depressant effect of ECT.

KW - Health Sciences

KW - depression

KW - Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT)

KW - Keywords:

KW - Low frequency transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS)

KW - Randomized trial

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85091844919&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/neu.2020.28

DO - 10.1017/neu.2020.28

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 32713367

VL - 32

SP - 328

EP - 338

JO - Acta Neuropsychiatrica (Online)

JF - Acta Neuropsychiatrica (Online)

SN - 1601-5215

IS - 6

ER -

ID: 60687731