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Low adiponectin levels at baseline and decreasing adiponectin levels over 10 years of follow-up predict risk of the metabolic syndrome

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@article{1a332619f63c49249a39b2c0be9327a3,
title = "Low adiponectin levels at baseline and decreasing adiponectin levels over 10 years of follow-up predict risk of the metabolic syndrome",
abstract = "AIM: Adiponectin is the most abundant adipokine and may play a key role in the interplay between obesity, inflammation, insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Thus, this large population-based cohort investigated whether adiponectin at baseline and/or a decrease in adiponectin during follow-up is associated prospectively with the risk of incident MetS.METHODS: Using a prospective study design, the development of MetS was examined in 1134 healthy participants from the community. Plasma adiponectin was measured at study entry and again after a median follow-up of 9.4 years (IQR: 9.2-9.7). During follow-up, 187 participants developed MetS, and 439 presented with at least two components of MetS.RESULTS: During follow-up, adiponectin decreased in participants who developed MetS, whereas adiponectin was increased in those who did not develop MetS (P<0.001). Those with low adiponectin levels (quartile 1) at baseline had an increased risk of developing MetS (OR: 2.92, 2.08-6.97; P<0.001) compared with those with high levels (quartile 4). After adjusting for confounding variables, low adiponectin levels at baseline remained independently associated with MetS (OR: 2.24, 1.11-4.52; P=0.017). Similarly, participants with a decrease in adiponectin during follow-up also had an increased risk of MetS (OR: 2.96, 2.09-4.18; P<0.001). This association persisted after multivariable adjustments, including for baseline adiponectin (OR: 4.37, 2.77-6.97; P<0.001). Finally, adiponectin levels at follow-up were inversely associated with an increase in the number of components of MetS (P<0.001); geometric mean adiponectin levels were 9.5mg/L (95{\%} CI: 9.0-10.0) for participants with no components vs 7.0mg/L (95{\%} CI: 6.3-7.9) for those with four to five components.CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Low plasma adiponectin levels at baseline and decreasing adiponectin levels during follow-up are both associated with an increased risk of MetS.",
author = "S Lindberg and Jensen, {J S} and M Bjerre and J Frystyk and A Flyvbjerg and J Jeppesen and R Mogelvang",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.",
year = "2017",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1016/j.diabet.2016.07.027",
language = "English",
volume = "43",
pages = "134--139",
journal = "Diabetes and Metabolism",
issn = "1262-3636",
publisher = "Elsevier Masson Editeur",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Low adiponectin levels at baseline and decreasing adiponectin levels over 10 years of follow-up predict risk of the metabolic syndrome

AU - Lindberg, S

AU - Jensen, J S

AU - Bjerre, M

AU - Frystyk, J

AU - Flyvbjerg, A

AU - Jeppesen, J

AU - Mogelvang, R

N1 - Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

PY - 2017/4

Y1 - 2017/4

N2 - AIM: Adiponectin is the most abundant adipokine and may play a key role in the interplay between obesity, inflammation, insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Thus, this large population-based cohort investigated whether adiponectin at baseline and/or a decrease in adiponectin during follow-up is associated prospectively with the risk of incident MetS.METHODS: Using a prospective study design, the development of MetS was examined in 1134 healthy participants from the community. Plasma adiponectin was measured at study entry and again after a median follow-up of 9.4 years (IQR: 9.2-9.7). During follow-up, 187 participants developed MetS, and 439 presented with at least two components of MetS.RESULTS: During follow-up, adiponectin decreased in participants who developed MetS, whereas adiponectin was increased in those who did not develop MetS (P<0.001). Those with low adiponectin levels (quartile 1) at baseline had an increased risk of developing MetS (OR: 2.92, 2.08-6.97; P<0.001) compared with those with high levels (quartile 4). After adjusting for confounding variables, low adiponectin levels at baseline remained independently associated with MetS (OR: 2.24, 1.11-4.52; P=0.017). Similarly, participants with a decrease in adiponectin during follow-up also had an increased risk of MetS (OR: 2.96, 2.09-4.18; P<0.001). This association persisted after multivariable adjustments, including for baseline adiponectin (OR: 4.37, 2.77-6.97; P<0.001). Finally, adiponectin levels at follow-up were inversely associated with an increase in the number of components of MetS (P<0.001); geometric mean adiponectin levels were 9.5mg/L (95% CI: 9.0-10.0) for participants with no components vs 7.0mg/L (95% CI: 6.3-7.9) for those with four to five components.CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Low plasma adiponectin levels at baseline and decreasing adiponectin levels during follow-up are both associated with an increased risk of MetS.

AB - AIM: Adiponectin is the most abundant adipokine and may play a key role in the interplay between obesity, inflammation, insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Thus, this large population-based cohort investigated whether adiponectin at baseline and/or a decrease in adiponectin during follow-up is associated prospectively with the risk of incident MetS.METHODS: Using a prospective study design, the development of MetS was examined in 1134 healthy participants from the community. Plasma adiponectin was measured at study entry and again after a median follow-up of 9.4 years (IQR: 9.2-9.7). During follow-up, 187 participants developed MetS, and 439 presented with at least two components of MetS.RESULTS: During follow-up, adiponectin decreased in participants who developed MetS, whereas adiponectin was increased in those who did not develop MetS (P<0.001). Those with low adiponectin levels (quartile 1) at baseline had an increased risk of developing MetS (OR: 2.92, 2.08-6.97; P<0.001) compared with those with high levels (quartile 4). After adjusting for confounding variables, low adiponectin levels at baseline remained independently associated with MetS (OR: 2.24, 1.11-4.52; P=0.017). Similarly, participants with a decrease in adiponectin during follow-up also had an increased risk of MetS (OR: 2.96, 2.09-4.18; P<0.001). This association persisted after multivariable adjustments, including for baseline adiponectin (OR: 4.37, 2.77-6.97; P<0.001). Finally, adiponectin levels at follow-up were inversely associated with an increase in the number of components of MetS (P<0.001); geometric mean adiponectin levels were 9.5mg/L (95% CI: 9.0-10.0) for participants with no components vs 7.0mg/L (95% CI: 6.3-7.9) for those with four to five components.CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Low plasma adiponectin levels at baseline and decreasing adiponectin levels during follow-up are both associated with an increased risk of MetS.

U2 - 10.1016/j.diabet.2016.07.027

DO - 10.1016/j.diabet.2016.07.027

M3 - Journal article

VL - 43

SP - 134

EP - 139

JO - Diabetes and Metabolism

JF - Diabetes and Metabolism

SN - 1262-3636

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 49085045