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Losartan has no additive effect on the response to heavy resistance exercise in human elderly skeletal muscle

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@article{6a0ceb501a074af3acaf45880b69f4cb,
title = "Losartan has no additive effect on the response to heavy resistance exercise in human elderly skeletal muscle",
abstract = "PURPOSE: To investigate the potential of blocking the angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1R) on the hypertrophy response of elderly human skeletal muscle to four months of heavy resistance exercise training.METHODS: 58 healthy elderly men (+65 years) were randomized into three groups, consuming either AT1R blocker (losartan, 100mg/day) or placebo for 4 months. Two groups performed resistance training (RT) and were treated with either losartan or placebo and one group did not train but was treated with losartan. Quadriceps muscle biopsies, MR scans and strength tests were performed at baseline and after 8 and 16 weeks. Biopsies were sectioned for immunohistochemistry to determine the number of satellite cells, capillaries, fibre type distribution and fibre area. Gene expression levels of myostatin, connective tissue and myogenic signalling pathways were determined by real time RT-PCR.RESULTS: Four months of heavy resistance training lead in both training groups to expected improvements in quadriceps (∼3-4{\%}) and vastus lateralis (∼5-6{\%}) cross sectional area, type II fibre area (∼10-18{\%}), as well as dynamic (∼13{\%}) and isometric (∼19{\%}) quadriceps peak force, but with absolutely no effect of losartan on these outcomes. Further, no changes were seen in satellite cell number with training and most gene targets failed to show any changes induced by training or losartan treatment.CONCLUSION: There does not appear to be any effect of AT1R blocking in elderly men during four months of resistance training. Therefore, we do not find any support for using AT1R blockers for promoting muscle adaptation to training in humans.",
author = "{Flindt Heisterberg}, Mette and Andersen, {Jesper L{\o}vind} and Peter Schjerling and Alberte Lund and Simone Dalskov and {Overg{\aa}rd J{\o}nsson}, Anders and Nichlas Warming and Mathilde Fogelstr{\o}m and Michael Kjaer and Mackey, {Abigail Louise}",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1152/japplphysiol.00106.2018",
language = "English",
journal = "Journal of Applied Physiology",
issn = "0161-7567",
publisher = "American Physiological Society",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Losartan has no additive effect on the response to heavy resistance exercise in human elderly skeletal muscle

AU - Flindt Heisterberg, Mette

AU - Andersen, Jesper Løvind

AU - Schjerling, Peter

AU - Lund, Alberte

AU - Dalskov, Simone

AU - Overgård Jønsson, Anders

AU - Warming, Nichlas

AU - Fogelstrøm, Mathilde

AU - Kjaer, Michael

AU - Mackey, Abigail Louise

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - PURPOSE: To investigate the potential of blocking the angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1R) on the hypertrophy response of elderly human skeletal muscle to four months of heavy resistance exercise training.METHODS: 58 healthy elderly men (+65 years) were randomized into three groups, consuming either AT1R blocker (losartan, 100mg/day) or placebo for 4 months. Two groups performed resistance training (RT) and were treated with either losartan or placebo and one group did not train but was treated with losartan. Quadriceps muscle biopsies, MR scans and strength tests were performed at baseline and after 8 and 16 weeks. Biopsies were sectioned for immunohistochemistry to determine the number of satellite cells, capillaries, fibre type distribution and fibre area. Gene expression levels of myostatin, connective tissue and myogenic signalling pathways were determined by real time RT-PCR.RESULTS: Four months of heavy resistance training lead in both training groups to expected improvements in quadriceps (∼3-4%) and vastus lateralis (∼5-6%) cross sectional area, type II fibre area (∼10-18%), as well as dynamic (∼13%) and isometric (∼19%) quadriceps peak force, but with absolutely no effect of losartan on these outcomes. Further, no changes were seen in satellite cell number with training and most gene targets failed to show any changes induced by training or losartan treatment.CONCLUSION: There does not appear to be any effect of AT1R blocking in elderly men during four months of resistance training. Therefore, we do not find any support for using AT1R blockers for promoting muscle adaptation to training in humans.

AB - PURPOSE: To investigate the potential of blocking the angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1R) on the hypertrophy response of elderly human skeletal muscle to four months of heavy resistance exercise training.METHODS: 58 healthy elderly men (+65 years) were randomized into three groups, consuming either AT1R blocker (losartan, 100mg/day) or placebo for 4 months. Two groups performed resistance training (RT) and were treated with either losartan or placebo and one group did not train but was treated with losartan. Quadriceps muscle biopsies, MR scans and strength tests were performed at baseline and after 8 and 16 weeks. Biopsies were sectioned for immunohistochemistry to determine the number of satellite cells, capillaries, fibre type distribution and fibre area. Gene expression levels of myostatin, connective tissue and myogenic signalling pathways were determined by real time RT-PCR.RESULTS: Four months of heavy resistance training lead in both training groups to expected improvements in quadriceps (∼3-4%) and vastus lateralis (∼5-6%) cross sectional area, type II fibre area (∼10-18%), as well as dynamic (∼13%) and isometric (∼19%) quadriceps peak force, but with absolutely no effect of losartan on these outcomes. Further, no changes were seen in satellite cell number with training and most gene targets failed to show any changes induced by training or losartan treatment.CONCLUSION: There does not appear to be any effect of AT1R blocking in elderly men during four months of resistance training. Therefore, we do not find any support for using AT1R blockers for promoting muscle adaptation to training in humans.

U2 - 10.1152/japplphysiol.00106.2018

DO - 10.1152/japplphysiol.00106.2018

M3 - Journal article

JO - Journal of Applied Physiology

JF - Journal of Applied Physiology

SN - 0161-7567

ER -

ID: 56333097