Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Long-Term Vestibular Outcomes in Cochlear Implant Recipients

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{b523984bfae948f9800ed517447431fd,
title = "Long-Term Vestibular Outcomes in Cochlear Implant Recipients",
abstract = "Background: Vestibular dysfunction is likely the most common complication to cochlear implantation (CI) and may, in rare cases, result in persistent severe vertigo. Literature on long-term vestibular outcomes is scarce. Objective: This paper aims to evaluate vestibular dysfunction before and after cochlear implantation, the long-term vestibular outcomes, and follows up on previous findings of 35 consecutive adult cochlear implantations evaluated by a battery of vestibular tests. Methods: A prospective observational longitudinal cohort study was conducted on 35 CI recipients implanted between 2018 and 2019; last follow-up was conducted in 2021. At the CI work-up (T0) and two postoperative follow-ups (T1 and T2), 4 and 14 months following implantation, respectively, all patients had their vestibular function evaluated. Evaluation with a vestibular test battery, involving video head impulse test (vHIT), cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMP), caloric irrigation test, and dizziness handicap inventory (DHI), were performed at all evaluations. Results: vHIT testing showed that 3 of 35 ears had abnormal vHIT gain preoperatively, which increased insignificantly to 4 of 35 at the last follow-up (p = 0.651). The mean gain in implanted ears decreased insignificantly from 0.93 to 0.89 (p = 0.164) from T0 to T2. Preoperatively, 3 CI ears had correction saccades, which increased to 11 at T2 (p = 0.017). Mean unilateral weakness increased from 19 to 40% from T0 to T2 (p < 0.005), and the total number of patients with either hypofunctioning or areflexic semicircular canals increased significantly from 7 to 17 (p < 0.005). Twenty-nine percent of CI ears showed cVEMP responses at T0, which decreased to 14% (p = 0.148) at T2. DHI total mean scores increased slightly from 10.9 to 12.8 from T0 to T1 and remained at 13.0 at T2 (p = 0.368). DHI scores worsened in 6 of 27 patients and improved in 4 of 27 subjects from T0 to T2. Conclusion: This study reports significant deterioration in vestibular function 14 months after cochlear implantation, in a wide range of vestibular tests. vHIT, caloric irrigation, and cVEMP all measured an overall worsening of vestibular function at short-term postoperative follow-up. No significant deterioration or improvement was measured at the last postoperative follow-up; thus, vestibular outcomes reached a plateau. Despite vestibular dysfunction, most of the patients report less or unchanged vestibular symptoms.",
keywords = "caloric irrigation test, cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials, cochlear implant, dizziness handicap inventory, dysfunction, vertigo, vestibular testing, video head impulse test",
author = "Rasmussen, {Kasper M{\o}ller Boje} and Niels West and Luchen Tian and Per Cay{\'e}-Thomasen",
note = "Copyright {\textcopyright} 2021 Rasmussen, West, Tian and Cay{\'e}-Thomasen.",
year = "2021",
month = aug,
day = "11",
doi = "10.3389/fneur.2021.686681",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
pages = "686681",
journal = "Frontiers in Neurology",
issn = "1664-2295",
publisher = "Frontiers Research Foundation",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Long-Term Vestibular Outcomes in Cochlear Implant Recipients

AU - Rasmussen, Kasper Møller Boje

AU - West, Niels

AU - Tian, Luchen

AU - Cayé-Thomasen, Per

N1 - Copyright © 2021 Rasmussen, West, Tian and Cayé-Thomasen.

PY - 2021/8/11

Y1 - 2021/8/11

N2 - Background: Vestibular dysfunction is likely the most common complication to cochlear implantation (CI) and may, in rare cases, result in persistent severe vertigo. Literature on long-term vestibular outcomes is scarce. Objective: This paper aims to evaluate vestibular dysfunction before and after cochlear implantation, the long-term vestibular outcomes, and follows up on previous findings of 35 consecutive adult cochlear implantations evaluated by a battery of vestibular tests. Methods: A prospective observational longitudinal cohort study was conducted on 35 CI recipients implanted between 2018 and 2019; last follow-up was conducted in 2021. At the CI work-up (T0) and two postoperative follow-ups (T1 and T2), 4 and 14 months following implantation, respectively, all patients had their vestibular function evaluated. Evaluation with a vestibular test battery, involving video head impulse test (vHIT), cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMP), caloric irrigation test, and dizziness handicap inventory (DHI), were performed at all evaluations. Results: vHIT testing showed that 3 of 35 ears had abnormal vHIT gain preoperatively, which increased insignificantly to 4 of 35 at the last follow-up (p = 0.651). The mean gain in implanted ears decreased insignificantly from 0.93 to 0.89 (p = 0.164) from T0 to T2. Preoperatively, 3 CI ears had correction saccades, which increased to 11 at T2 (p = 0.017). Mean unilateral weakness increased from 19 to 40% from T0 to T2 (p < 0.005), and the total number of patients with either hypofunctioning or areflexic semicircular canals increased significantly from 7 to 17 (p < 0.005). Twenty-nine percent of CI ears showed cVEMP responses at T0, which decreased to 14% (p = 0.148) at T2. DHI total mean scores increased slightly from 10.9 to 12.8 from T0 to T1 and remained at 13.0 at T2 (p = 0.368). DHI scores worsened in 6 of 27 patients and improved in 4 of 27 subjects from T0 to T2. Conclusion: This study reports significant deterioration in vestibular function 14 months after cochlear implantation, in a wide range of vestibular tests. vHIT, caloric irrigation, and cVEMP all measured an overall worsening of vestibular function at short-term postoperative follow-up. No significant deterioration or improvement was measured at the last postoperative follow-up; thus, vestibular outcomes reached a plateau. Despite vestibular dysfunction, most of the patients report less or unchanged vestibular symptoms.

AB - Background: Vestibular dysfunction is likely the most common complication to cochlear implantation (CI) and may, in rare cases, result in persistent severe vertigo. Literature on long-term vestibular outcomes is scarce. Objective: This paper aims to evaluate vestibular dysfunction before and after cochlear implantation, the long-term vestibular outcomes, and follows up on previous findings of 35 consecutive adult cochlear implantations evaluated by a battery of vestibular tests. Methods: A prospective observational longitudinal cohort study was conducted on 35 CI recipients implanted between 2018 and 2019; last follow-up was conducted in 2021. At the CI work-up (T0) and two postoperative follow-ups (T1 and T2), 4 and 14 months following implantation, respectively, all patients had their vestibular function evaluated. Evaluation with a vestibular test battery, involving video head impulse test (vHIT), cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMP), caloric irrigation test, and dizziness handicap inventory (DHI), were performed at all evaluations. Results: vHIT testing showed that 3 of 35 ears had abnormal vHIT gain preoperatively, which increased insignificantly to 4 of 35 at the last follow-up (p = 0.651). The mean gain in implanted ears decreased insignificantly from 0.93 to 0.89 (p = 0.164) from T0 to T2. Preoperatively, 3 CI ears had correction saccades, which increased to 11 at T2 (p = 0.017). Mean unilateral weakness increased from 19 to 40% from T0 to T2 (p < 0.005), and the total number of patients with either hypofunctioning or areflexic semicircular canals increased significantly from 7 to 17 (p < 0.005). Twenty-nine percent of CI ears showed cVEMP responses at T0, which decreased to 14% (p = 0.148) at T2. DHI total mean scores increased slightly from 10.9 to 12.8 from T0 to T1 and remained at 13.0 at T2 (p = 0.368). DHI scores worsened in 6 of 27 patients and improved in 4 of 27 subjects from T0 to T2. Conclusion: This study reports significant deterioration in vestibular function 14 months after cochlear implantation, in a wide range of vestibular tests. vHIT, caloric irrigation, and cVEMP all measured an overall worsening of vestibular function at short-term postoperative follow-up. No significant deterioration or improvement was measured at the last postoperative follow-up; thus, vestibular outcomes reached a plateau. Despite vestibular dysfunction, most of the patients report less or unchanged vestibular symptoms.

KW - caloric irrigation test

KW - cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials

KW - cochlear implant

KW - dizziness handicap inventory

KW - dysfunction

KW - vertigo

KW - vestibular testing

KW - video head impulse test

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85113524095&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3389/fneur.2021.686681

DO - 10.3389/fneur.2021.686681

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 34456848

VL - 12

SP - 686681

JO - Frontiers in Neurology

JF - Frontiers in Neurology

SN - 1664-2295

M1 - 686681

ER -

ID: 67832237