Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Long-term survival outcomes after primary transoral robotic surgery (TORS) with concurrent neck dissection for early-stage oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{a461f1ad746a43c0acba074f732e8d8d,
title = "Long-term survival outcomes after primary transoral robotic surgery (TORS) with concurrent neck dissection for early-stage oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: In 2013, transoral robotic surgery (TORS) was implemented as a protocolled treatment alternative to the traditional radiotherapy (RT) in Denmark for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). In 2017, we published our first prospective feasibility study, showing that TORS with concurrent neck dissection successfully achieved negative margins in 29 out of 30 patients (97%) with early-stage OPSCC.AIMS/OBJECTIVES: This follow-up study aims to evaluate the five-year overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS).METHODS: Retrospective follow-up study including 30 patients treated with TORS for early-stage OPSCC (T1-T2, N0-N1, M0, UICC 7th edition) from September 2014 to January 2016 at a single head and neck cancer centre in Denmark. The five-year OS, DSS and RFS, including a detailed analysis of the recurrences, were addressed.RESULTS: The five-year OS, DSS and RFS was 90%, 93% and 87%, respectively. Median follow-up was 54.5 months. Four patients developed a recurrence, with one regional, one distant metastatic (M) and two locoregional recurrences. The median time to recurrence was 24 months (range 3-42 months).CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: This follow-up study demonstrates good five-year OS, DSS and RFS in a prospective cohort of patients undergoing TORS and neck dissection for early-stage OPSCC.",
keywords = "disease-specific survival, human papillomavirus, oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, overall survival, recurrence-free survival, Transoral robotic surgery",
author = "Frederiksen, {Joakim Grant} and Channir, {Hani Ibrahim} and Larsen, {Mikkel Hjordt Holm} and Anders Christensen and Jeppe Friborg and Charabi, {Birgitte Wittenborg} and Niclas Rubek and {von Buchwald}, Christian",
year = "2021",
month = jul,
doi = "10.1080/00016489.2021.1939147",
language = "English",
volume = "141",
pages = "714--718",
journal = "Acta Oto-Laryngologica",
issn = "0001-6489",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "7",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Long-term survival outcomes after primary transoral robotic surgery (TORS) with concurrent neck dissection for early-stage oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

AU - Frederiksen, Joakim Grant

AU - Channir, Hani Ibrahim

AU - Larsen, Mikkel Hjordt Holm

AU - Christensen, Anders

AU - Friborg, Jeppe

AU - Charabi, Birgitte Wittenborg

AU - Rubek, Niclas

AU - von Buchwald, Christian

PY - 2021/7

Y1 - 2021/7

N2 - BACKGROUND: In 2013, transoral robotic surgery (TORS) was implemented as a protocolled treatment alternative to the traditional radiotherapy (RT) in Denmark for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). In 2017, we published our first prospective feasibility study, showing that TORS with concurrent neck dissection successfully achieved negative margins in 29 out of 30 patients (97%) with early-stage OPSCC.AIMS/OBJECTIVES: This follow-up study aims to evaluate the five-year overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS).METHODS: Retrospective follow-up study including 30 patients treated with TORS for early-stage OPSCC (T1-T2, N0-N1, M0, UICC 7th edition) from September 2014 to January 2016 at a single head and neck cancer centre in Denmark. The five-year OS, DSS and RFS, including a detailed analysis of the recurrences, were addressed.RESULTS: The five-year OS, DSS and RFS was 90%, 93% and 87%, respectively. Median follow-up was 54.5 months. Four patients developed a recurrence, with one regional, one distant metastatic (M) and two locoregional recurrences. The median time to recurrence was 24 months (range 3-42 months).CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: This follow-up study demonstrates good five-year OS, DSS and RFS in a prospective cohort of patients undergoing TORS and neck dissection for early-stage OPSCC.

AB - BACKGROUND: In 2013, transoral robotic surgery (TORS) was implemented as a protocolled treatment alternative to the traditional radiotherapy (RT) in Denmark for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). In 2017, we published our first prospective feasibility study, showing that TORS with concurrent neck dissection successfully achieved negative margins in 29 out of 30 patients (97%) with early-stage OPSCC.AIMS/OBJECTIVES: This follow-up study aims to evaluate the five-year overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS).METHODS: Retrospective follow-up study including 30 patients treated with TORS for early-stage OPSCC (T1-T2, N0-N1, M0, UICC 7th edition) from September 2014 to January 2016 at a single head and neck cancer centre in Denmark. The five-year OS, DSS and RFS, including a detailed analysis of the recurrences, were addressed.RESULTS: The five-year OS, DSS and RFS was 90%, 93% and 87%, respectively. Median follow-up was 54.5 months. Four patients developed a recurrence, with one regional, one distant metastatic (M) and two locoregional recurrences. The median time to recurrence was 24 months (range 3-42 months).CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: This follow-up study demonstrates good five-year OS, DSS and RFS in a prospective cohort of patients undergoing TORS and neck dissection for early-stage OPSCC.

KW - disease-specific survival

KW - human papillomavirus

KW - oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

KW - overall survival

KW - recurrence-free survival

KW - Transoral robotic surgery

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85109066783&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/00016489.2021.1939147

DO - 10.1080/00016489.2021.1939147

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 34191671

VL - 141

SP - 714

EP - 718

JO - Acta Oto-Laryngologica

JF - Acta Oto-Laryngologica

SN - 0001-6489

IS - 7

ER -

ID: 67742496