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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Long-term experiences of being a simulation-educator: A multinational interview study

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The long-term reactions, experiences and reflections of simulation educators have not been explored. In a semistructured, exploratory interview study, the experiences of simulation educators in either Advanced Life Support (ALS) or Crisis Resource Management (CRM) courses in Denmark, Norway and the USA were analyzed. Three overarching themes were identified: (1) general reflections on simulation-based teaching, (2) transfer of knowledge and skills from the simulation setting to clinical settings and (3) more overarching transformations in simulation educators, simulation participants, and the healthcare system. Where ALS was deemed as high on the efficiency dimension of learning, CRM courses were described as high on the innovation dimension. General reflections, transfer and transformations described were related to differences in course principles. The results are relevant for career planning, faculty development and understanding simulation as social practice.

Original languageEnglish
JournalMedical Teacher
Volume40
Issue number7
Pages (from-to)713-720
Number of pages8
ISSN0142-159X
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Jul 2018

ID: 56304028